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Tuesday
Feb142012

Riviera's 6th, 1929 And Today

I know I do this every year and I promise to do some before/afters of other holes, but I know there are new readers out there who might like to marvel at seeing how a bunker has dimensions, texture and appropriate scaling...and then ends up like the 6th hole today, as shot during Tuesday's practice round.

 

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Reader Comments (22)

WOW! Who did the redesign? Like having sex with a condom on.
02.14.2012 | Unregistered Commenterstlman
For sure the old bunker looks better. Of more interest is the stupid bunker on the left and what looks to be a tee extension behind the green. Can a shot roll back to the green from that bank?
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterEl Gringo
It looks like any ball landing in the 1929 bunker would not be assured a perfect lie 95% of the time.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterGreg
Is it any wonder why Coore & Crenshaw are red hot? Simple formula: Dial-it back to the original natural design...by scrubbing the Fazio-and-Dye-ness out of a great routing & layout and bring back McKenzie and Ross ideas and wahhh-lahhh...now, all we need is persimmon woods and we'll have our game back.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterPutmedownfora6
My best guess is the hole plays the same in both pics. The black & white photo looks more dramatic as does the shaggy bunker - but neither make the hole play any differently.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterHoselhit
Actually Hoselhit, it's about 30-40 yards longer than in Thomas's day. So no, it doesn't play the same.
02.15.2012 | Registered CommenterGeoff
Actually Geoff, between the ball and the clubs, it's probably pretty close.
But the old design is beautiful most definitely
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterBrad
Great picture to compare against the old. I don't think the left hand little pot bunker, as it looks in the "Now" pic, is a big issue. I love the look of the large bunker in each photo. Thanks for passing this stuff along. I love the historical photos.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterPete the Luddite
@ Tommy Naccarato It is M - A - R - Z- O - L -F we wouldn't want you to to kick the wrong guy! While the trend in redesign and new course architecture is to 'return to the classics' and the use of template holes; i.e. biarittz, redan, eden, etc. and the more natural look in bunker design (see work at LA Country Club), it appears Marzolf has sort of stayed in neutral. Ironically, Riviera does not mention his resdesign work in the club's website. Coore / Crensahw should benefit by this obvious miscarriage of justice.
The aesthetic difference in the bunker capes is sort of jolting, but a lot of clubs seem to have gone away from the more difficult-to-maintain look that one sees in the old Thomas capes, with all of their irregular, jutting protuberances. If any club can afford the maintenance, it would be the Riv, one of the greatest golf experiences in the land.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered Commentertlavin
Geoff,

Great pics! I have been staring at old pics of Seminole and I have to ask: has Marz been out there, too?
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterMark B
Geoff,

Any chance of a before and after of the split fwy on #18?
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterLudell Hogwaller
Good point, Brad, considering they hit an 8 iron 180 these days.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterChester
Ludell
I believe the split fairway is the 8th.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterBill S.
Chester and Brad, The 8 Iron these days has the loft of the 6iron back than. King Cobra is to blame for this.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered Commentermark wittig
Thanks, Bill S.

Geoff,
I am unable to find an early shot of Thomas split fwy on Riviera, #8. If you get the urge, a before and after would be greatly appreciated.
thanks.
rw
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterLudell Hogwaller
Take a look at the redesign Gil Hanse did at L.A.C.C. , another Thomas original. You will see the return of the old, classic, Thomas capes.

www.lacc.org Awesome. Maybe Riviera can get Hanse to 'fix' their place too. Also, Bel Air is a Thomas desgin. Thomas noted that LACC was his best work, even better than Riviera.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterTheProFromDover
TheProFromDover, the land is better at LACC North. I was fortunate to play both last month for the first time. Outside of the tee shot on #1 and #18 at Riv, it is a pretty flat course. Although, I was surprised at how much #6 plays uphill. Even with the little tee coverage that it gets, I thought it was relatively flat. Geoff, it would be great to see before and after pictures of the split fairway on 8. I played with a long time member and they asked me after we played the hole what I thought and although I thought it was a decent hole, I thought it just didn't fit. Geoff, I would love to get your perspective on the Fazio redo of that hole.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterRyan
@ ryan I agree Love the elevations at LACC - makes club selection fun. Hanse is so good - doesn't get the credit he deserves except by those within the industry. #6 at Rivivera is really a great par 3 - the pic in the article doesn't show the bunker within the green complex that divides the green into 2 separate greens. If an architect did that today the members would run him off of the project. Return to the classics!
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterTheProFromDover
mark wittig, it stuns me how few people are aware of the point you make regarding loft and King Cobra, you nailed that one.

As for the LACC bunkers, it also stuns me how many times they've been cited in this thread apparently without any realization that Geoff Shackelford was directly involved in that project.
02.15.2012 | Unregistered CommenterDel the Funk
tlavin,
Tell me how the look is hard to maintain? LACC didn't put an edger on theirs for over six months from April to November and that was only to clean up a few spots. Not sure how that's more maintenance, but maybe you can enlighten us?
02.15.2012 | Registered CommenterGeoff
@ Del Good point - Apologies - figured everyone knew Geoff was a design partner with Gil. Waht's teh old adage about ASSUME? Tip of the hat to Geoff for the LACC work. Let's protect the classics! go to www.lacc.org and read the commemorative piece Geoff co-authored. Grat insight and history to LACC and the remodel project. Well done Geoff.
02.16.2012 | Unregistered CommenterTheProFromDover

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