Latest From GolfDigest.com
Latest From The Loop
Twitter
Books
  • Lines of Charm: Brilliant And Irreverent Quotes, Notes, And Anecdotes from Golf's Golden Age Architects
    Lines of Charm: Brilliant And Irreverent Quotes, Notes, And Anecdotes from Golf's Golden Age Architects
  • The Future of Golf: How Golf Lost Its Way and How to Get It Back
    The Future of Golf: How Golf Lost Its Way and How to Get It Back
    by Geoff Shackelford
  • Grounds for Golf: The History and Fundamentals of Golf Course Design
    Grounds for Golf: The History and Fundamentals of Golf Course Design
    by Geoff Shackelford
  • The Art of Golf Design
    The Art of Golf Design
    by Michael Miller, Geoff Shackelford
  • Alister MacKenzie's Cypress Point Club
    Alister MacKenzie's Cypress Point Club
    by Geoff Shackelford
  • The Golden Age of Golf Design
    The Golden Age of Golf Design
    by Geoff Shackelford
  • The Good Doctor Returns: A Novel
    The Good Doctor Returns: A Novel
    by Geoff Shackelford
  • Masters of the Links: Essays on the Art of Golf and Course Design
    Masters of the Links: Essays on the Art of Golf and Course Design
  • The Captain: George C. Thomas Jr. and His Golf Architecture
    The Captain: George C. Thomas Jr. and His Golf Architecture
    by Geoff Shackelford
Current Reading
  • The Magnificent Masters: Jack Nicklaus, Johnny Miller, Tom Weiskopf, and the 1975 Cliffhanger at Augusta
    The Magnificent Masters: Jack Nicklaus, Johnny Miller, Tom Weiskopf, and the 1975 Cliffhanger at Augusta
    by Gil Capps
  • His Ownself: A Semi-Memoir
    His Ownself: A Semi-Memoir
    by Dan Jenkins
  • Professional Golf 2014: The Complete Media, Fan and Fantasy Guide
    Professional Golf 2014: The Complete Media, Fan and Fantasy Guide
    by Daniel Wexler
  • Every Shot Counts: Using the Revolutionary Strokes Gained Approach to Improve Your Golf Performance and Strategy
    Every Shot Counts: Using the Revolutionary Strokes Gained Approach to Improve Your Golf Performance and Strategy
    by Mark Broadie
Classics
  • Golf Architecture in America: Its Strategy and Construction
    Golf Architecture in America: Its Strategy and Construction
    by Geo. C. Thomas
  • The Course Beautiful : A Collection of Original Articles and Photographs on Golf Course Design
    The Course Beautiful : A Collection of Original Articles and Photographs on Golf Course Design
    Treewolf Prod
  • Reminiscences Of The Links
    Reminiscences Of The Links
    by Albert Warren Tillinghast, Richard C. Wolffe, Robert S. Trebus, Stuart F. Wolffe
  • Gleanings from the Wayside
    Gleanings from the Wayside
    by Albert Warren Tillinghast
  • Planet Golf USA: The Definitive Reference to Great Golf Courses in America
    Planet Golf USA: The Definitive Reference to Great Golf Courses in America
    by Darius Oliver
  • Planet Golf: The Definitive Reference to Great Golf Courses Outside the United States of America
    Planet Golf: The Definitive Reference to Great Golf Courses Outside the United States of America
    by Darius Oliver
Writing And Videos
Feedblitz
Enter your Email


Powered by FeedBlitz
« $2.3 Billion For IMG On $200 Million In Annual Earnings? | Main | Revamped Trump Doral Re-Opens For Play »
Wednesday
Dec182013

News Of The Weird: PGA Of Japan Brass Resign En Masse After Two Peers Play Golf With Yakuza Boss

APF translates a Jiji Press story reporting that 91 PGA of Japan's representatives, from officers to board directors, will step down to help restore public trust after it was found a vice chair and board member played numerous rounds with the head of a yakuza crime group.

The move is meant to restore public trust in the PGA of Japan. Seems a bit excessive to me, but hey, I'd expect the same if we learned Ted Bishop and Derek Sprague were whapping it around the links with Whitey Bulger.

The current Japan PGA website list of officials.

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments (7)

Hey let's play the PGA Championship there -- we owe 'em at least that much!!
12.18.2013 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
I've worked in Japan a couple of times and have some knowledge of the culture, and this looks like a large number of resignations even for the Japananese. For example, very few executives resigned over the Triple Crisis nuclear accident. Quiet association with Yakuza is normally not this toxic for Japanese businessmen, or even politicians. So my guess is that either a lot of folks who resigned were also tainted by Yakuza money, or they had serious grievances with the organization and wanted to send a strong message. Probably it's the first reason, or at least mostly that.
If 90+ resign because they teed it up and/or associated with tattooed 9-fingered gangsters, would they have done the same if they played with politicians and bankers?
12.18.2013 | Unregistered Commenterjohnnnycz
Japanese recreational golfers require "licenses" to play golf?
They do over here as well @Ted B. We call em "Green Cards" and the worst part of my job (by far) is having to give thumbs up or down to newbies before I send em off to fend for themselves on the course. Rules/etiquette and knowing "how to move around out there" is what I focus on the most since no one cares if someone duffs it all over the place...but please do it quickly, quietly and without destroying the course.

The flipside is this: A typical 24hdcp club golfer can pay some money, sit thru a seminar for a few hrs, and voila they get a certificate that "allows" them teach golfers how not to break 100 and permanently groove the ole hosel rocket move.
12.20.2013 | Unregistered Commenterjohnnnycz
A 24-handicap?
. . . That would mean that probably half of all US recreational golfers would be banned from their own courses, since perhaps 80% of male recreational golfers can't break 100 on a consistent-basis. Last I read, the typical casual-golfer would hold a 32-36 handicap.

No wonder golf isn't growing on Continental Europe...and the Japanese fly to Hawaii or Australia to play golf.
The Japan Golf Industry is in so much trouble. Too much, OLD BOYS CLUB where nothing gets done.
Sad to see a country that hosts the second largest golfing market in the world, having so much trouble stepping into the
21st centry.
01.29.2014 | Unregistered CommenterTommy Boy

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
All HTML will be escaped. Hyperlinks will be created for URLs automatically.