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Wednesday
Jan252017

Bryson's New Stroke Coming Under Excessive Rules Scrutiny?

Adam Schupak at The Morning Read reports that side-saddler Bryson DeChambeau's putter was ruled non-conforming on the even of last week's Careerbuilder Challenge.

DeChambeau expressed disappointment at the handling of the notification, while the USGA won't comment on what made the club non-conforming.

Even more intrigue arrives in the form of comments from DeChambeau instructor Mike Schy.

"They basically threatened him that if he showed up on Thursday, they would DQ him," said Mike Schy, DeChambeau's longtime instructor. "I think they thought he wouldn't have a backup and he'd have to go back to conventional and it would be over.
 
"The week before, they made him put lead tape and mark it up," Schy said. "Every week, they've been inspecting it. It's bad. It's really bad. I'm telling you, they do not want him putting this way. For some reason, they think it is an enormous advantage, and it is not."

DeChambeau debuted the side-saddle stroke last fall and it did have anchoring elements. So far the method has been a success for the PGA Tour rookie.

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Reader Comments (18)

No more of an anchoring element than Kuchar, yet his stroke is acceptable. It's ugly, but he's not straddling the line, anchoring the putter so I don't get what the problem is.
01.25.2017 | Unregistered CommenterCaddy kev
Also it's strange how the shaft has to be set to the back to be conforming. Not a fan of his, but I do like the fact that he'll fight the usgs on this nonsense. If they truly want to make putting hard, slow up the green speeds and stop rolling them. Anchoring and this creating an advantage, give me a break.
01.25.2017 | Unregistered CommenterCaddy kev
As I've said many times over the last 3 or 4 years: if using a belly putter or a broomstick or face-on was an absolute advantage and the professionals made 20-footers the way they do five-footers today, then everybody would be doing it. But please take note - - they're not.

As for Bryson and his putter, the USGA says the potential ban is between the organization and DeChambeau but of course this means that Bryson can reveal all at any time and I hope he does.
01.25.2017 | Unregistered CommenterBenseattle
Everyone's hitting it so far classic courses are becoming pitch and putt and someone's shooting 59 every week now but let's crack down on the putting of someone who's struggling to make cuts. Glad the USGA has their priorities straight.
01.25.2017 | Unregistered CommenterDrBunsenHoneydew
This is deflection and "fake news" perpetrated apparently by Schupak. Nowhere in the story does it say the USGA is looking at DeChambeau's style of putting. They ruled his putter non-conforming. Huge difference. The only reference to the USGA "going after" his putting style come from DeChambeau and his teacher. As far as I know the governing body hasn't said a word about his stroke. And my guess is they join us all in waiting for him to start winning every week. Nothing to see here.
I find the confidentially of the non conformance strange. Is it because he modified the putter to make it non conforming and could be subject to the "cheat" label?
01.25.2017 | Unregistered CommenterKG
TruthInAdvertising identified the kernel of BAD's rules problem, although he misused the term "fake news." The putter doesn't conform because is isn't a golf club, it's a plum bob pendulum. And, Langer's method should be included in the list of outlawed methods of putting.
No worries.Ball and clubs hotter than ever, Drives going 350 the new normal.
Players-and now caddies-repeatedly standing on or nearly on, their lines when "reading" putts-putting pressure to feel the break with their feet-no worries about the players behind them.
59 watch multiple times every week.
#1 player basically saying he's going to take as much time as he wants to play.

Yep USGA-it's the putter-of a guy nowhere near the lead no less.

We need to eaxamine the sand play rules (as in heads buried in it)of the USGA ......
01.25.2017 | Unregistered CommenterJeff Warne
Well he was at The PGA show this week, I would assume that the USGA balls and implement team was there, hopefully they had a pow wow and he can build a conforming mallet.
01.25.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPaboy
My post from 12/7/16 calling the legality putter into question:

http://www.geoffshackelford.com/homepage/2016/12/7/the-story-behind-brysons-side-saddle-move.html#comment21668403

"From the linked Schupak article: "The homemade prototype putter he is using this week is 37 1/2-inches long, the same length as all of his irons, center-shafted (with a 7-iron shaft) and weighs 525 grams. DeChambeau even drew the aim-point with a Sharpie."

Homemade prototype? Does it conform? USGA approved? I think he might have a serious problem with that putter, shaft looks awfully steep. Could be wrong, but it looks questionable...."

-----------------------------------

http://www.usga.org/rules/equipment-rules.html#!rule-14617,align

Appendix II, 1d provides that:

When the club is in its normal address position the shaft must be so aligned that:

(i) the projection of the straight part of the shaft on to the vertical plane through the toe and heel must diverge from the vertical by at least 10 degrees. If the overall design of the club is such that the player can effectively use the club in a vertical or close-to-vertical position, the shaft may be required to diverge from the vertical in this plane by as much as 25 degrees;

(ii) the projection of the straight part of the shaft on to the vertical plane along the intended line of play must not diverge from the vertical by more than 20 degrees forward or 10 degrees backward.

This Rule is particularly relevant to putters, and it exists mainly as a means for disallowing croquet or vertical-pendulum style putters (with vertical shafts) and shuffle-board style strokes, as well as designs which facilitate such strokes (see Figure 4).

12.7.2016 | Analyst
01.25.2017 | Unregistered CommenterAnalyst
Any chance of posting better photos of the club, from different angles? Back in the fall, some readers thought that it looked as if it might be more upright than allowable -- though Schy probably would have acknowledged that, if that were the violation.
01.25.2017 | Unregistered Commenter3foot1
He needs to get some advice from Berhard Langer.
01.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterDon
Analyst nails it.

Golf is not croquet. If De Chambeau really has an engineering degree, the he should be able to understand perfectly that the shaft has to be slanted at least 10 degrees, and he should be able to build a club that does that.
01.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterHerb
From USGA Web Site:

Exception for Putters: The shaft or neck or socket of a putter may be fixed at any point in the head.

So, lets go through the check list for putters.

d. Alignment
When the club is in its normal address position the shaft must be so aligned that:

(i)
the projection of the straight part of the shaft on to the vertical plane through the toe and heel must diverge from the vertical by at least 10 degrees (see Fig. II). If the overall design of the club is such that the player can effectively use the club in a vertical or close-to-vertical position, the shaft may be required to diverge from the vertical in this plane by as much as 25 degrees;

(ii)
the projection of the straight part of the shaft on to the vertical plane along the intended line of play must not diverge from the vertical by more than 20 degrees forwards or 10 degrees backwards (see Fig. III).


All look fine So Far.

a. Straightness
The shaft must be straight from the top of the grip to a point not more than 5 inches (127 mm) above the sole, measured from the point where the shaft ceases to be straight along the axis of the bent part of the shaft and the neck and/or socket (see Fig. V).

OK, so far so good. By the Way, There are allot of exceptions for Putters.


a. Plain in Shape
The clubhead must be generally plain in shape. All parts must be rigid, structural in nature and functional. The clubhead or its parts must not be designed to resemble any other object. It is not practicable to define plain in shape precisely and comprehensively. However, features that are deemed to be in breach of this requirement and are therefore not permitted include, but are not limited to:

(i) All Clubs

holes through the face;
holes through the head (some exceptions may be made for putters and cavity back irons);
features that are for the purpose of meeting dimensional specifications;
features that extend into or ahead of the face;
features that extend significantly above the top line of the head;
furrows in or runners on the head that extend into the face (some exceptions may be made for putters); and
optical or electronic devices.

OK, dose not get any simpler than a chunk of steel rod cut in half.



When the clubhead is in its normal address position, the dimensions of the head must be such that:

the distance from the heel to the toe is greater than the distance from the face to the back; Looks about the same as does the two ball and the futurea.

the distance from the heel to the toe of the head is less than or equal to 7 inches (177.8 mm); Yep

the distance from the heel to the toe of the face is greater than or equal to two thirds of the distance from the face to the back of the head;
the distance from the heel to the toe of the face is greater than or equal to half of the distance from the heel to the toe of the head; and

all seem good, and reduntant

the distance from the sole to the top of the head, including any permitted features, is less than or equal to 2.5 inches (63.5 mm).

yep

All seems good to me by the rules.

Hope D releases the letter as to why it is non-conforming
01.26.2017 | Unregistered Commentermark
@mark, from just looking at the pictures, I don't think the distance from the heel to the toe is greater than the distance from the face to the back. Didn't Pelz have trouble with this when he first brought out that 3-ball putter?
01.26.2017 | Unregistered Commentertexaswedge
From above:
"Players-and now caddies-repeatedly standing on or nearly on, their lines when "reading" putts-putting pressure to feel the break with their feet-no worries about the players behind them.
59 watch multiple times every week."

I admittedly dont know all the intricacies of the rule book. Is there a visual or videa that shows somebody exploiting this. I'd like to know more on this - thanks.
01.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterStreaky Putter
agree texas wedge-the putter in the picture looks like it flunks. and the 3 ball became the two ball because it didn't conform. Who is this Mike Schy? where did he graduate from college? Lets hear from the SMU engineering graduate.

these rules are pretty clear to those who

a) read them and

b) can use a pencil, paper and a ruler.

Maybe we've discovered the issue?
01.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterHerb
How many courses have had to change their greens because of non conforming putters?

Now how many courses have had to changed because of the ball?

Why are we talking about this?
02.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterOdd job

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