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Monday
Apr172017

It's Come To This: Now College Golf Coaches Have To Pretend They Are Happy About Early Defections

Spring means flowers, the Easter bunny and college basketball coaches pretending to be happy for not-ready-for-primetime freshmen declaring for the NBA draft. And now that absurd fake joy, which in no way helps a coach put forward his best lineup, must apparently be expressed in college golf.

Colorado has its best hopes of reaching the NCAA Men's Championship since 2012 but with a Web.com Tour exemption in front of him, Senior Jeremy Paul is leaving school a few months early, Golfweek's Kevin Casey reports.

“Jeremy has determined turning pro at this time is in the best interest for his budding professional golf career,” Colorado head coach Roy Edwards said in a release. “We respect his decision. He has a tremendous future in front of him.”

No you probably don't but we understand that if you were to say what you really think, some recruit will think you are not going to be the ideal place to prep for the PGA Tour. Let the dreadful cycle begin!

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Reader Comments (19)

What will Maverick McNealy do after the Walker Cup?
04.17.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPG
If he has any sense, change his name.
04.17.2017 | Unregistered CommenterAF
AF +1
04.17.2017 | Unregistered CommenterKLG
Trace it all to a lack of leadership by USGA. Starts with AJGA. Later, dedicated golf schools replaced traditional HS education, all blessed by USGA. Then year 'round college golf programs, the minor league for pro golf. All developed future professional stars. Is it all good for the game? We shall see. As for the USGA, lead, follow, or get out of the way. They've chosen the latter. Doing nothing.
04.17.2017 | Unregistered CommenterGhost of FH
Just further emphasizes our lost priorities. When we deify those who play a game for a living, this what happens. Not to get heavy, but we condone kids being good at sport and nothing else. No surprise that we get Tiger, DJ et al. No different than every other sport, sadly.
04.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterMJR
article says the guy is graduating. So how is this different than skipping the ceremony to start your job early?
04.18.2017 | Unregistered Commenterczervik
You have a "team" you're a part of for the ceremony?
04.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterKLG
@GhostofFH,

Please explain how the USGA "blessed" the creation of Golf-focused schools and what you think the USGA should have done to stop the creation of the AJGA and such schools.

Thanks.
04.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterCarl Peterson
Why is NCAA golf the holy grail? And what musician would you tell to "stay in school" if they had the opportunity to make money at their chosen profession?

Sorry Geoff, but the NCAA model is crumbling as we speak, because people are figuring out that those who favor the status quo only do so because the money is flowing in their direction, rather than those who create the interest. Why should a guy have to go through the charade of sitting in a calculus class because he can stick the pin from 190 yards out 9 times out of 10?
04.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPat(another one)
I'm no fan of Woods, but that would be the worst thing ever if he told guys to stay in school. The guy had $40 million waiting from Nike. That is FU money. Saying someone should have passed that up to "stay in school" is foolish, to be nice. The school will always be there afterwards. He might think he may not have turned out to be what he has become, but that is on him, not because he didn't finish school. You don't pass up that kind of money when it is there.
04.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPat(another one)
Athletic scholarships should be a contract.
Leave early, should have to pay for unused portion to refund scholarships to replace that player.
if athletic scholarships should be a contract, then athletes should be free to negotiate the best contract they can get--i.e. scholarships should be subject to the antitrust laws.

and golf is not a team sport, even if we play five and count four. These other kids can make the NCAAs or not, as their talent will take them.
04.18.2017 | Unregistered Commenterczervik
Apprentice, until recently scholarships were one year renewable. Meaning the coach could come up with a reason to withhold the scholarship.

The athletes are not the ones who need to be looked upon with disdain.
04.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPat(another one)
The NCAA sham of cultivating "student" athletes is no more evident than in the contact sports. For every star that leaves early there's a trail of wannabes that wouldn't have been accepted in school if not for their athletic prowess. A degree they can't get doesn't help them. At least golf has a longer learning curve physically to make it as a pro even if you leave early. The pro money's so huge it's tough to fault the decision making, even at long odds.
04.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterOriginal AG
This horse (leaving college early) left the barn a long time ago. Football, basketball, baseball, now golf. It's no different. For the few (and they are the few in each sport) that have the talent to make it at the next level, they're going to take the shot. And please, let's not cry for the poor schools. They and the NCAA have made billions off "student-athletes" for decades. How else can a half-wits like most college b-ball coaches make 4-5 mil a year?
04.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPops
I'm not sure asking kids to honor a commitment is looking on with disdain.
The offer of a scholarship is pretty nice compensation especially in smaller sports.

Now if you want me to talk about he lunacy of NCAA graft I'm in.


Sorry on a different device (apprentice)
04.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterSmugprius
Disagree. This kid put that coach on the map. first time I've heard of Colorado in golf since Hale Irwin. The kid more than paid for himself in recruiting cred, etc.

Had he flamed out, he'd be gone---"homesick"

I'll worry about kids honoring commitments when the coaches vote to provide 4 year guaranteed scholarships. some colleges still recruit more players than they have scholarships to give out.
04.18.2017 | Unregistered Commenterczervik
There it is again...the dreaded "future in front of him". Where else would the future be!!
04.19.2017 | Unregistered CommenterGrandpaLarry
great views all ! nice thread
04.24.2017 | Unregistered CommenterCouples

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