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Wednesday
May172017

Vijay Loses TPC But Wins In Court Monday, Trial Coming Soon

The beacon of misery and bitterness that is Vijay Singh faded from contention at The Players, but the 54-year-old won a key court decision Monday, reports Brian Wacker at Golf World.

On Monday, Judge Eileen Bransten issued a decision favorable to Singh on motions that had been pending since last fall, denying in part the tour’s motion for summary judgment.

“We can proceed to trial,” said Singh’s attorney Peter Ginsberg when contacted by Golf Digest.

The suit, which was filed a few days prior to the 2013 Players Championship, claims the tour was negligent in its handling of Singh’s anti-doping violation and breached its implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, which caused harm to the now 54-year-old Fijian’s reputation.

The tour had no comment.

Meanwhile, Singh's caddie at The Players announced he was moving on Sunday night. So it was a split decision week...

 

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Reader Comments (13)

If his whole case is based on harm being cause to his reputation then he doesn't have a leg to stand on
05.17.2017 | Unregistered CommenterDrBunsenHoneydew
He has more than a leg to stand on, and he will win, just as he's managed to get it this far. The tour will try to settle, they will make ever increasing offers until (in their minds) hopefully he agrees to settle. If it proceeds, the cesspool that is the tour will be laid bare for everyone to see.
05.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPress Agent
I am an avid golfer and a 30 year commercial litigator, with no connection to the case. From the pleadings I have read online, I can say that Vijay's case is truly ludicrous. The judge is meh, but the jury will likely be highly educated middle to upper income Manhattan residents - some of the smartest jurors you can find anywhere in the country. I hope the tour stiffens its resolve and sees it through verdict, because they will almost certainly win.
05.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPat
Has the PGA Tour ever won a lawsuit ? I know that their record is abysmal. So many skeletons that they normally settle once they know it ain't a bluff.
05.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterExEmp
"...highly educated middle to upper income Manhattan residents - some of the smartest jurors you can find anywhere in the country."

Ooooo, be still my heart!

And with that, I'm off to work on taming my flying right elbow. Cheers!
05.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterKLG
Seems that VJ's deer antler spray habit, allegedly, was readily outed by the Tour, while every other player's transgressions (we have no idea what was up with DJ) that warranted discipline were kept as mum as the Queen's secrets.
05.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterGutta Percha
It's pretty predictable that Vijay will always get trashed by some but the Tour handled this incident terribly.
I suspect the move to settle will take a very short time which is unfortunate as other players will want to know exactly how inconsistently the Tour handles these issues. The Tour, not wanting these issues publicly disclosed will pay and sign the inevitable non-disclosure agreement so nobody admits fault and the incompetency remains hidden. Of course, Vijay and his real lawyers knew this and it's likely to turn into a winning strategy.
Pat, having read much of the available material as well, I cannot believe you advise clients.
05.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterKG
What Gutta Percha said.

How about the others?

Vijay and the surely innocuous commercial placebo Deer Antler Spray are named while the pot/coke/maybe even beta-blockers users and their specific transgression are redacted?

Why?

How is that defensible?

As for Vijay - I am fully informed enough to pass judgement on his alleged transgressions - but I do recall watching him play in one of the last groups on Sunday at Royal Birkdale in '91 - playing with Seve - and marveling at the long path he must have trod from Fiji to Southport.

How much further he had to go. Right into the hall of fame.

Vijay may not be Mr. Warmth & Congeniality but his accomplishments are very real and underappreciated.
05.18.2017 | Unregistered CommenterTed Ray's Pipe
The hate for Vijay stems from where? He's universally recognised as the hardest working player on the tour - he's 54 and still has a swing many can only dream of. He's won in the era of Tiger, and won well. Far from taking his fellow players to court (I doubt if one will testify for or against him) he's actually defending them.

As others have said, there's way worse that has gone on in the tour and players have gotten away with - Vijay gets it because he's easy meat.

I hope he settles for squillions and gets a public apology,

''The beacon of misery and bitterness''? Before you write that, look in a mirror and see if in some way that doesn't apply to yourself.
05.19.2017 | Unregistered CommenterCenter Cut
I think Vijay has a very good case. After Finchem's arrogance and motions to dismiss didn't work the Tour has to settle because they sure as hell don't want to answer discovery requests on their drug testing program. That would blow the lid off the corruption Finchem micromanaged to keep Tiger on the tee so Finchem's bonus money kept ballooning.
05.19.2017 | Unregistered CommenterLong Knocker
We know Vijay personally. A very, very funny man...does get a bad rap.....a lot of comments on here that are very true....but I don't look for an quick settlement. There is no love between Vijay and Finchem...it has been brewing for a long, long time. To use Long Knocker's pharase, I believe he does want to "blow the lid off the corruption Finchem micromanaged"....


"Vijay may not be Mr. Warmth & Congeniality but his accomplishments are very real and underappreciated." +1
05.19.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPro From Dover
Long knocker is the first guy to get close to the truth. Cue the "but Woods has never been found to actually get anything from Galea" crowd in 3 posts or less. Just like the Lance Armstrong fanatics. Finchem handles everything differently if Woods wasn't needing protection, IMHO.

Singh won't be settling, or we would have by now. He wants this laid bare, so the selective enforcement stops.
05.19.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPat(another one)
"Selective enforcement",

Pat (another one) sums up the whole issue at the heart of it beautifully, think Tiger's drop at Augusta on 15.

Vijay fan for years

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