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Thursday
Jun152017

"He’s the most-read golf writer in the world. He just wants a little more company."

Ed Sherman uses the U.S. Open to file a Poynter.org story on AP golf writer Doug Ferguson and the dwindling number of golf writers covering the sports for local papers.

He notes the concern about the increased presence of PGATour.com covering the sport over independent outlets.

Ferguson can’t help but take note of the PGA Tour going all-in with PGATour.com. During most tournaments, the tour’s digital operation makes up a large chunk of the press room with its writers and social media crew.

Clearly, the PGA Tour has the most resources and the greatest access, but Ferguson contends golf fans don’t get the complete picture from its site. He says the content always comes from a biased and, let’s say, decidedly positive point of view.

“I don’t know a lot of people who go to the site except to look at the leaderboard,” Ferguson said. “You’re only going to see the birdie putt that gets made. You’re not going to see the birdie putt that gets missed.”

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Reader Comments (10)

He's right about the utility of pgatour.com. It's good for one thing, checking scores. The other fluff? No different from the "newsletters" I get from my congress critters. All are a waste of perfectly good pixels.
06.15.2017 | Unregistered CommenterKLG
Too much good news is bad for you!
06.15.2017 | Unregistered CommenterIvan Morris
Sometimes I might watch the 1 or 2 minute recaps of the previous days play . Stats section is excellent.
Have you seem the utter disaster that is now is the European Tours website? Be careful for what you might ask for!
06.16.2017 | Unregistered CommenterIrish Golf Nut
To a great degree, its supply and demand, but if you are a true fan of the game, you will search and dig and find the whole story. You can say all you want about 'growing the game', but in my view, the fan (and their money) that the tour attracts don't come close to the essence and layers of golf
06.16.2017 | Unregistered CommenterDavid Simms
Doug Ferguson is correct. PGAT dot com is a great stat resource....that's it.

As for the UsOpen...the online coverage at the dot com domain is pretty darn good. The nifty picture in picture tool is great. Almost zero commercials and a shade more laid back commentary minus Marucci.
06.16.2017 | Unregistered CommenterJohnnnycz
Little has changed since the 1980s when the "most-read" golf writer was AP's Bob Green. There were no halcyon days of newspapers paying for full-time golf writers.
06.16.2017 | Unregistered CommenterScott
And I miss ol' Tiny sitting at the door to the press room ... guarding all those quivering typists. The old days are long gone.
06.16.2017 | Unregistered CommenterSclaff and Foozle
Who is Tiny?
06.16.2017 | Unregistered CommenterZimmer
Zimmer,

For ages, he guarded the press room at Augusta National during the Masters and he was the cooler at U.S. Opens, too. He was huge, with an enormous gut, and hillbilly-quirky, and he chewed on a cheap cigar all day. He was one of a kind. Like a character in a David Lynch movie. He is missed.
06.16.2017 | Unregistered CommenterSclaff and Foozle
Newspapers are on life support. Death is near.
06.16.2017 | Unregistered CommenterJake

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