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Sunday
Jul162017

Meet The Artisans: Birkdale's Work-For-Play Members

What a fascinating story by Today's Golfer writer Kevin Brown on the members of Royal Birkdale who are the last of a rare breed that helps maintain the course in exchange for membership rights.

They're butchers, bakers, candlestick makers and members of the club.

It's been that way since the formation of the Birkdale Artisans – a golf club within a golf club – in 1931. The chief role of the artisans – a dying breed of work-to-play member at some of the UK's most established courses – is to back-up the greenkeeping team, helping ensure the course looks immaculate, with regular raking of the 123 bunkers and repairing considerably more divots high on the list of duties.

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Reader Comments (7)

Civilized and aspirational!
07.16.2017 | Unregistered CommenterKLG
When I was young we had a similar (vaguely) system at our muni except that the club was composed of juniors and we were assigned jobs that were paid by free golf. We loved that course and looked after it. Some of my best friends 45 yrs later are from that muni although we are scattered.
What a great club for,those 32
07.17.2017 | Unregistered CommenterTaffy
Big payoff in last sentence of article that all fees paid by members go to the clubhouse upkeep, sounds like an American club in the end.
07.17.2017 | Unregistered CommenterPABoy
I went around w/ an artisan at Hoylake a couple of years ago.
Admirable.
07.17.2017 | Unregistered Commenterzz
Luv this story, Geoff! Thanks for the info.
07.17.2017 | Unregistered Commenternancy
Went out a few times at Hoylake with the artisans. The waiting list to become one there is about 8 to 10 years and you have to live in town. My mate had his son put his name down the day he turned 14. Their clubhouse at Hoylake is the green shack out past 18th green.
8 to 10 year waiting list does not square with "last of a dying breed". More like "waiting for guys to die so i can get in"
07.18.2017 | Unregistered Commentered

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