Twitter: GeoffShac
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Wednesday
Jul262017

Bloomberg: Time Inc. Exploring Sale Of Golf Magazine

Bloomberg's Gerry Smith quotes Time Inc. CEO Rich Battista as saying the venerable print title and its Golf.com website are for sale along with Coastal Living and Sunset.

In the interview, Battista called the three publications “wonderful brands” but said Time needed to invest in other properties instead. The company also publishes People and Sports Illustrated.

“It’s really important to focus on the key biggest growth drivers of this company that will move the needle the most,” he said. “These are wonderful titles and wonderful brands. They’re just relatively smaller in our portfolio.”

Meanwhile, WWD's Alexandra Steigrad reports that Golf Digest Chief Business Officer Howard Mittman has left for Bleacher Report amid rumors of more shake-ups in the Conde Nast business model.

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Reader Comments (10)

Given that Editor David Clarke bid his farewell in the most recent issue this isn't real shocking news.

I actually have enjoyed GOLF these past few years. They have had some good informative interviews and I always looked forward to Michael Bamberger's back page column.

Tough business.
07.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterSun Mountain Man
I only read golf magazines when I'm in a drug store. In the last few years, Golf seems better than Golf Digest. Both thin reads are swamped with ads and subscription cards. I'm surprised they exist. I guess library and professional office subscriptions help keep them afloat.
07.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterFC
Inevitably, Digest is next. Their on-line product is superior to Golf.com, but the print magazine (and ratings biz) are inept.
07.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterLong Ball
GM #1
Hope it doesn't change
07.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterGo
Another nail in the golf's coffin, here in US. Not surprised for a publication whose sustainability is inextricably linked to the health of the game. And it sure seems like golf is on life support.
07.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterTheFonz
The Fonz - eeyyh!

Life support to the in crowd people, but good as ever to the base crowd. Bowling went thru this.

I have a friend who is a world class collector. We were talking about the inflated price of baseball cards 20 years ago, and he related, that at one time, robin eggs were a major high end collector item and felt like BBcards would tank in the same fashion. I shiver to think what some people have paid for CHEETOS- look it up.

And so as collectables come and go, so to do fringe sports, and golf is a fringe sport. THAT IS GOOD! It doesn't have to be $$$ elite to be elite. I like that it is not for everyone. It is hard. ~~~It is a life story in 18 chapters~~~

Not everyone can do things that are hard very well.

I am always amused at the posts that point out some winner of the week as being a so what golfer, ranked #46X or 6XX - heck - they are in the TOPE 1000 GOLFERS IN THE FRIGGIN' WORLD! They are the best! While the average golfer's score is 101-118 they are plus handicap players. The point being, just like tennis, there will always be a contingent of try it out people, and it is up to the courses to be hospitable to their customers, and offer the best condition course in their budget. When times were flush, many had a ''don't bother me'' attitude to the paying customer, and that coupled with the difficulty of playing ran a lot off. I sell on ebay- the number of golf items has increased 500% in the last 10-12 years. I could go on, but yall know.

I do read features in golf magazines, but I do not read 'tips'. Two page photos and titles to stories may add thickness to a publication, but tt is simply recycle bulk. Reading is far from dead. Both rags could use an infusion of new, of 2017 BS to bring in the 10 year in and out golfer, of which 13-26% will become lifers. Also what about a teen golf rag- start it online and then take it to print. And for the toddlers- there is always ''Golf Highlights'' soon to be in every doctor waiting room- hey if there is a DC&P for 4 year olds? Ave a frog hopping and a squirrel gathering nuts next to a green; a lizard in a bunker- you know, for the 0-2 year olds...I could go on, but Shack probably broke the lead in his pencil from writing all this down so fast...


dig
07.26.2017 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
dig, I like the tips.

Re golf sustaining, I'm bearish. Significant course closures were happening before Tiger hit the fire hydrant. That trend continues.
07.26.2017 | Unregistered CommenterFC
Sad to see the decline of golf magazines.

When Golf has a cover devoted to wine, it speaks of the death of good golf magazine writing and coverage.

Magazines are committing suicide by having content that directs readers to web sites - ever see a web site directing readers to content in the printed magazine.

I'll miss the stack of golf reading in my bathroom....
07.27.2017 | Unregistered CommenterBud
+1 Bud. Cancelled Golf Digest when I realized every article was up on social media less than a week after receiving a new magazine. Why pay?
07.27.2017 | Unregistered CommenterAdamup
There's a pretty good regional golf magazine in Colorado that all the PR agencies, advertisers and Resorts love to death. But if they went to the golf shops where these are offered free every month they would be shocked. Stacks and stacks are never picked up and taken home. Lots of bird cages could be lined by these magazines that nobody ever sees.
11.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterBill

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