Twitter: GeoffShac
  • Playing Through: Modern Golf's Most Iconic Players and Moments
    Playing Through: Modern Golf's Most Iconic Players and Moments
    by Jim Moriarty
  • Tommy's Honor: The Story of Old Tom Morris and Young Tom Morris, Golf's Founding Father and Son
    Tommy's Honor: The Story of Old Tom Morris and Young Tom Morris, Golf's Founding Father and Son
    by Kevin Cook
  • His Ownself: A Semi-Memoir (Anchor Sports)
    His Ownself: A Semi-Memoir (Anchor Sports)
    by Dan Jenkins
  • The Captain Myth: The Ryder Cup and Sport's Great Leadership Delusion
    The Captain Myth: The Ryder Cup and Sport's Great Leadership Delusion
    by Richard Gillis
  • The Ryder Cup: Golf's Grandest Event – A Complete History
    The Ryder Cup: Golf's Grandest Event – A Complete History
    by Martin Davis
  • A Life Well Played: My Stories
    A Life Well Played: My Stories
    by Arnold Palmer
  • Harvey Penick: The Life and Wisdom of the Man Who Wrote the Book on Golf
    Harvey Penick: The Life and Wisdom of the Man Who Wrote the Book on Golf
    by Kevin Robbins
  • Teeing Off: Players, Techniques, Characters, and Reflections from a Lifetime Inside the Game
    Teeing Off: Players, Techniques, Characters, and Reflections from a Lifetime Inside the Game
    by Ken Bowden
« Video: Eye On Design, The Genius Of LACC's Short Par-3 15th | Main | Roundup: 2017 Walker Cup Almost Here, GB&I Bullish On Chances »
Thursday
Sep072017

Golf Top 100 Panel Confidential: Most Underrated Course, Favorite Golden Age Architect And Course They'd Play Every Day

There is some fun follow-up content from the Golf Magazine Top 100 U.S. and World lists here. They tackle most underrated great course (North Berwick edges LACC North!), greatest Golden Age architect (Good Doc), best modern day architect (Coore), most overrated design element (Conditioning), and course they’d chose to play every day (Cypress Point).

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments (18)

Oh, so politically safe
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterGolfFan
So much better than GD's lists!

GM may not have the 1200 paying raters picking up Jerry Tarde's bar tab, but at least it's void of dumb categorical limitations, less vapidly skewed to raw difficulty, and doesn't rely on statistical stupidity to form it's list. Fun and form (great design) remain paramount.
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterLong Ball
Politically Safe - never!

Interesting points worth noting – However, other points of note which some might define as way more interesting are - North Berwick West Links most of the Holes were designed pre 1880’s & as for MacKenzie he praise much of the work of the pre-1899 designers to the point that he incorporated many of their Hole designs into his own.
Colt although a child of the 1890’s produced designs, that tor my way of thinking are rather bland, interesting but still very bland and CBM again was way more into the re-producing much of what he had seen in Scotland in his younger days.

The shame is that many of todays designers have not followed the path of MacKensie or CBM, but more followed the way the game had been directed by the masses who were not fully aware of the game or its intent apart from a low score. So later designers pursued the mass approach to the game and design, instead of actually embracing the traditional game from pre 1899, perhaps to an extent an exception could be made for Tom Doak. Even Wilson from Merion in the 1910’s visited the UK to understand the game and course design, showing that there is a will by some to maintain and understand the traditions of the game.

Before we consider designers we need to know what it is they know about golf that we don’t and have answers to the following questions, do they fully endorse the need for distance and having cart paths upon the course – subject to the answer to those two question will define if we have a designer of merit or a boring old fart.

The interesting points raise, even if we consider Ross and Doak, they have tried to utilise the Scottish direction to many of their designs which has taken them a distance down the path to GCA knowledge, however the likes of Hanse is fundamentally lacking in these areas, as can be seen at Castle Stuart - good course but rather cluttered with fake adornments – more leaning towards a Trump sort of guy.

Then what should a golf course look like, a strip of waste Links land close to self-sustainability or a super manicured, super smooth and totally only sustained by hand of man on a daily basis. If the latter then question if you are in the right industry and/or playing the right sport.
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterTom Morris
All of Pebble Beach's acclaim comes down to 7 holes, really, so it's clearly the most overrated course in the world.

Here's an underrated one (for Golf Magazine specifically): Laurel Valley. We might be slipping down the Golf Digest's list as treeless and brown has replaced tree-lined and green as what's currently in vogue but the course doesn't appear at all in Golf Magazine. Now, it's hard to blame the magazine itself as their course raters never play there but it's certainly still worthy of being in America's top 100.
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterDrBunsenHoneydew
Dr Honeydew,

Pebble is most certainly overrated, yet has an allure for some that is simply ageless and immune from displacement.

Laurel Valley, on the other hand, is a very good, hardly great, Dick Wilson design that remains a well-mainicured golf hole maze set amidst a forest. It is best described as difficult, pretty and a stern test, but the word fun is hardly ever used. Seems to me to be best relegated to GD list of tough but pretty (think Pam Anderson).
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterLong Ball
This is more interesting than the top 100 list, but at least the big list shows that interesting and shorter courses are coming back in vogue. The first time I played Prestwick my world view of golf changed. The game can and should be an enjoyable challenge, not just a challenge. I've been fortunate enough to play a bunch of these courses and I'd jump at the chance to play Ballyneal, TOC, Prestwick and Rye again before Baltustrol, WFW (ugh - talk about overrated) or Carnoustie. The older I get the less I like deep rough, water hazards and trees. I want a short walk to the next tee, to rarely lose a ball, to putt on wild, reasonably fast greens and enjoy a cold one in a modest clubhouse.
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterGinGHIN
Raters do get to Western PA.
I played Laurel about 2 years ago and enjoyed it very much.
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterpinkJacket
"The older I get the less I like deep rough, water hazards and trees. I want a short walk to the next tee, to rarely lose a ball, to putt on wild, reasonably fast greens and enjoy a cold one in a modest clubhouse."

thanks ginGHIN - this sums it up perfectly. And you will enjoy Ballyneal. Make a point to go there.

jb
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterJim Beckner
GinGHIN:

could not agree with you more. In my neck of the woods, for example, playing Butler and Medina is a chore, akin to getting kicked 18 times in the head. Chicago Golf, on the other hand, sublime.
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterSari
Yale is probably my favorite course...I was fortunate enough to have friends attend in late 80s and was able to play (as a "student") for $6.00!

I'd encourage anyone who has an alumni/student connection to try and play...it's unforgettable!
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterManku
Most underrated golf course architect - Wayne Stiles. Most underrated course - Taconic.

I was fortunate to have played another Stiles course this summer, Country Club of Barre. Great routing, great bunch of holes.

Taconic is about as much fun as you can have on a golf course, unless it is Cypress Point, the Old Course, or the Upper Cascades. I'll still take Taconic.
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterHardy Greaves
Underrated/Overrated is overrated.
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterFC
LACC & Riv are still underrated. Both should be higher than Oakmont..fast, big greens don't make a course. Cypress should be No. 1 in the U.S. Old course number one in the world. In the U.S., I'd rank them:
1. Cypress
2. Augusta
3. Riviera
4. LACC North
5. Pine Valley
6. Pebble Beach
09.8.2017 | Unregistered CommenterShow Laddie
"The older I get the less I like deep rough, water hazards and trees. I want a short walk to the next tee, to rarely lose a ball, to putt on wild, reasonably fast greens and enjoy a cold one in a modest clubhouse."

Southern Pines GC and Pine Needles fit this to a tee, with the exception of "wild" greens.
09.9.2017 | Unregistered CommenterKPK
This list, while entertaining, might as well be a fairy tale. I can't play the private ones, pay for the well known public ones, or get to the ones overseas. Oh, well...I guess it is something to aspire to...lol
09.10.2017 | Unregistered CommenterBDF
Melbourne Sandbelt.
if you ever can - do it!!!
09.10.2017 | Unregistered Commentermetro18
Long Ball, based on the fact that I spend a lot of my time at Laurel (admittedly I'm a tad biased) and also on your description of it I'd say that, if you were there at some point, your memory of it has faded. Your description read like second hand information from some obsolete text.
09.11.2017 | Unregistered CommenterDrBunsenHoneydew
GD raters visited Rockaway Hunting Club yesterday. It's a course that seems like it would fit in more with the Golf and GW ethos of recently restored (Hanse), shorter (it's about 6450 on the card), open (took down a few thousand trees during Hanse's work), Golden Age designs (Emmet and Tillinghast) playing along an arm of the sea (Reynolds Channel between Long Island and Long Beach Barrier Island in this case). In the past raters have said they like the course but "wish they could have seen the whole course," so to accommodate the GD raters the tees were allll the way back and the pins were tucked in places they wouldn't even do for the club championship! Resistance to scoring my eye! Give me firm, fast, and FUN any day of the week!
09.11.2017 | Unregistered CommenterMike

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
All HTML will be escaped. Hyperlinks will be created for URLs automatically.