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Wednesday
Feb072018

Climate Coalition: "Only a small increase in sea-level rise would imperil all of the world's links courses"

A depressing new report on even the slightest change in sea levels suggests most of the world's links are imperiled, with some already on the cusp of major damage in a perfect storm scenario.

From an unbylined BBC report on The Climate Coalition issuing a warning to golf, football and cricket as the sports to be hardest hit, with links courses the most endangered.

The Open is the only one of golf's majors played in the UK and is hosted on links courses, including - as well at St Andrews and Royal Troon - Royal Birkdale, Hoylake, Royal Lytham & St Annes, Muirfield, Sandwich, Turnberry, Portrush and 2018 venue Carnoustie.

It adds that "more than 450 years of golfing history" at Montrose, one of the five oldest courses in the world, is at risk of being washed away by rising seas and coastal erosion linked to climate change.

Research published by Dundee University in 2016 showed the North Sea has crept 70 metres towards Montrose within the past 30 years.

Chris Curnin, director at Montrose Golf Links, said: "As the sea rises and the coast falls away, we're left with nowhere to go. Climate change is often seen as tomorrow's problem - but it's already eating away at our course.

"In a perfect storm we could lose 5-10 metres over just a couple of days and that could happen at pretty much any point."

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Reader Comments (21)

Hope you're aware of what is happening at Royal North Devon, oldest Club in England still playing over it's original course area. Not only are the 7th and 8th holes in serious danger of being washed away neither the local Council nor the habitats and conservation lobby will do anything to assist. This despite the fact that the ingress of the sea also imperils a 1970s era landfill which those of us who grew up in the area know has industrial and medical waste sitting in it, just under the soil and turf covering that was put over it. The whole area faces a possible polution incident and no one apparently cares
02.7.2018 | Unregistered CommenterTim Aggett
Big difference between coastal erosion and actual sea levels, rising or falling. There has always been climate change, ever since the big bang, but models and predictions have never been accurate, too many factors to consider.

Trust Nostradamus more than any of those models, he says that St Andrews stays dry for another 500 years, he reserved a 2518 tee time at the Old Course in one of his later quatrains.
02.7.2018 | Unregistered CommenterConvert
Good one, Convert. Not much to be concerned about for the near future. Other than His Orangeness & Rocketman.
02.7.2018 | Unregistered CommenterFC
@FC...my thoughts exactly. Good one!
02.7.2018 | Unregistered Commenternancy
Phew! Thanks so much, Convert and dmac. Here I was worrying that people would take the overwhelming scientific consensus seriously.

I especially loved the use of Nils-Axel Mörner as an expert. Where'd they find that great pic of him without his foil hat?
02.7.2018 | Unregistered CommenterSteve B
And Rio's Olympic golf course may be gone less than a century after it was built: http://aussiegolfer.com.au/rios-olympic-golf-course-water-end-century/
02.7.2018 | Unregistered CommenterMichael
Doggerland...
02.8.2018 | Unregistered CommenterRose
Quote: "slightest change in sea levels"

Hmmm...

Sea levels have been steadily rising at the rate of a few millimeters per year for as long as tidal gauge records have been kept, and, more importantly, show no sign of an acceleration of the long-term trend in the past 50 years from "climate change". Attached is a link to the tidal gauge records at the entrance to New York harbor. They look pretty much the same everywhere else.

https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/sltrends/sltrends_station.shtml?stnid=8518750

The alleged "overwhelming scientific consensus" is the "big lie": it's the overwhelming consensus of scientists who benefit from massive funding of climate change research. Simply put, if there is no "climate crisis", then there is no funding, and all of those newly unemployed climate scientists would have to find jobs in legitimate fields of research or go flip burgers.
02.8.2018 | Unregistered CommenterJeff Martin
Intelligent people lose their minds on this topic. My brother completely believes his launch monitor for ball speed, launch angle and spin rate of his golf ball. But he also thinks highly sophisticated NASA satellite altimetry about the oceans is a bunch of politically motivated crap. Go figure.

BTW tide gauges at any one spot are useless in regards to measuring ocean rise. Land masses rise and fall. People who cite this kind of thing are usually parroting nonsense put out by the spin factories.
Patches O'Houlihan-

"NASA satellite altimetry about the oceans" has only existed since 2008, so it can't tell us anything about long-term trends.

I posted that tidal gauge records "look pretty much the same everywhere else", which you can confirm for yourself here:

https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/sltrends/mslUSTrendsTable.htm
02.8.2018 | Unregistered CommenterJeff Martin
False. Topex/Poseidon mission was 1992 followed by the Jason series. Sediment cores reveal sea level data going back 2000 years. Very flat until about 150 years ago.

Look at Alaska data on the same NOAA website. It's nothing like NYC, in fact it shows sea levels receding! So are sea levels receding, or is it just local data? I think the latter. Though you probably disagree,

That's our world today. As a famous guy says...Sad.
Patches O'Houlihan-

OK, since 1992 is 26 years. Not long enough to draw any conclusions on long-term trends.

An increase that started 150 years begins 100 years before any man-made "climate change" as asserted by the IPCC; so that data is kind of irrelevant to this discussion. BTW, could you provide links to the data you cite?

Setting aside what's going on Alaska (ground level rising, perhaps, as you mentioned earlier?), I have yet to see any tidal gauge records that show an acceleration in the past 50 years. Have you? Could you link to them?
02.8.2018 | Unregistered CommenterJeff Martin
The oceans have gotten warmer since the industrial revolution, as water will absorb more heat than land. A warming body of water will expand and have differing effects on weather (mostly in its volatility and extremes).

No shell fish can survive in waters 2 degress centigrade warmer than current temperatures. The world's coral reefs are devastated by warmer water and water flows.

What if the current consensus is only half right? The consequences are still catastrophic. But our generation simply won't entertain concepts that affect our immediate gratification. Too bad for the next inhabitants our planet.
02.9.2018 | Unregistered Commenterthe baron
https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2018/02/13/study-sea-level-rise-is-accelerating-and-its-rate-could-double-in-next-century/
02.13.2018 | Unregistered CommenterCarl Peterson
the baron:

Quote: "The oceans have gotten warmer since the industrial revolution, as water will absorb more heat than land. A warming body of water will expand and have differing effects on weather (mostly in its volatility and extremes)."

This study, published in January, from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, concludes that ocean temperatures have risen just 0.1 degrees C over the past 50 years.

https://scripps.ucsd.edu/news/new-study-identifies-thermometer-past-global-ocean
02.13.2018 | Unregistered CommenterJeff Martin
Carl Peterson:

As I already noted, the satellite studies cover an insufficient period upon which to base long-term conclusions, only conjecture.
02.13.2018 | Unregistered CommenterJeff Martin
How many years of data will be enough?
02.14.2018 | Unregistered CommenterCarl Peterson
Good question. I’d think you’d want at least 100 years, same as some of the longer tidal gauge records. There are multi-decade ocean cycles you’d want to span.
02.14.2018 | Unregistered CommenterJeff Martin
Not me -- everybody I care about will be dead in 50 years so I only need to bury my head in the sand for that long.
02.14.2018 | Unregistered CommenterCarl Peterson
Geoff, Carl Peterson, Patches O'Houlihan, the baron and others-

The attached makes very interesting reading, assuming, of course, one has an interest in the truth about sea level rise and all the factors influencing it (including fudging the satellite data):

https://thsresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/ef_rrt_ca-sea-level.pdf
02.20.2018 | Unregistered CommenterJeff Martin

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