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« The Donald Moving Forward With Second Scottish Course | Main | Aussie Masters Primed For Fine Finish... »
Saturday
Nov172012

Who Needs A Phone? Twitter Hawks Catch LPGA Rules Violation

Golf Channel's Judy Rankin talks about the "not level playing field" caused by phoned-in and now, Tweeted-in rules violations after Sun Young Yoo committed a pretty obvious violation at the CME Group Titleholders."

Judy reported in this highlights package posted on GolfChannel.com:

"It was actually a Tweet. More than one Tweet."

The Golf Channel wrap-up:

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Reader Comments (20)

After all these years of at-home Rules Experts calling in to rat out violations, I'm surprised one or more Tours haven't established a more equitable policy. Yes, a violation is a violation, but as Rankin points out correctly, players feel there is a great amount of inequality present: leaders and prominent players are subject to television scrutiny while others, farther back in the pack, are not. THOSE players could be committing violations right and left but because those incidents fail to make the broadcast, the unintentional offender gets off scott-free.

Certainly, there could be a policy instituted where various Tour simply don't accept the calls, tweets and emails from various squealers; only those Actually Present on the golf course (players, caddies, officials, media and yes -- even fans) are the only ones allowed to point out a violation.

Wouldn't that level the playing field?

Also, let's not make discovering a violation retro-active. Wasn't Craig Stadler's famous "building a stance with a towel under a tree in San Diego" reported a day after it occurred? He was DQ'ed anyway. So if that's the case, why don't we go back several weeks, maybe even several years, to seek out other rules offenses that weren't reported "on time." The day's play is over? Fine... no more after-the-fact disqualifications. Let the self-styled at-home experts call penalties on their buddies; not on the PGA Tour from a thousand miles away.

(By the way, I've always disagreed with the Stadler ruling. Placing a towel between your knees and wet ground is hardly "building a stance," it was placed there merely to protect those stylish double-knits!)
11.17.2012 | Unregistered Commenterbenseattle
These inquisition-type rulings must be tough on the players. I know they can take it but still.
11.17.2012 | Unregistered CommenterPete Poulin
I don't disagree that it is somewhat unfair that their is extra scrutiny being on TV. But isn't the same thing true on site for popular players ? I've been to several LPGA Tourneys, and foursomes of unknown players are usually followed by friends and relatives only (or so it seems). But how do you prevent this ? How fair would have been if she had (theoretically) knocked it stiff and made a tourney winning birdie after an illegal drop ? Clearly she and her caddy were not famillar with the rule, and despite there being 2 other players and caddies (as well as camera people from GC) right there, nobody did anything about something that was certainly not hard to spot if you were looking for it. If you ban people calling in, I think then the only solution is to have a walking rules official following each group (or maybe even each player) and calling penalties when they incur. That is certainly against the traditions of the game I know, but I think the traditions of the game also assume a knowlege of the rules as well an obligation for the other players to monitor each other.
11.17.2012 | Unregistered CommenterBrianS
benseattle,

You have absolutely NO clue about the Rules of golf....
11.17.2012 | Unregistered CommenterTrysil
Players with larger galleries get more "blocks" that prevent balls from going further astray. Does that need equalizing as well.

Drop the ball like a pro and it doesn't matter if one person or one million witnessed it. She should be thanking people for assisting her with accurately reporting her score - which is her responsibility, and the expectation of the field and fans.
11.17.2012 | Unregistered CommenterTighthead
<< benseattle,

You have absolutely NO clue about the Rules of golf.... >>

Goodness, what a perceptive and insightful contribution you make.

Let's see, I played in dozens and dozens of USGA-governed tournaments as a teen in the San Diego Junior Golf Association, played a little at Arizona State and since then I've competed successfully in various city and state amateur championships around the country. Never a penalty, never a dispute concerning my knowledge of the rules.

But, because I have an OPINION with which you disagree (never bothering to offer any contrasting views based on fact) your only resort is nothing short of a lame, uninformed personal insult. Seriously, sonny, is that the best you can do?

Perhaps you belong at another board where unthinking boors and mindless blather (your specialty) is the order of the day.

Have fun at BombSquadGolf.com.

Ass.
11.17.2012 | Unregistered Commenterbenseattle
<< benseattle,

You have absolutely NO clue about the Rules of golf.... >>

Goodness, what a perceptive and insightful contribution you make.

Let's see, I played in dozens and dozens of USGA-governed tournaments as a teen in the San Diego Junior Golf Association, played a little at Arizona State and since then I've competed successfully in various city and state amateur championships around the country. Never a penalty, never a dispute concerning my knowledge of the rules.

But, because I have an OPINION with which you disagree (never bothering to offer any contrasting views based on fact) your only resort is nothing short of a lame, uninformed personal insult. Seriously, sonny, is that the best you can do?
11.17.2012 | Unregistered Commenterbenseattle
"Not a level playing field"? Whatever. Life isn't fair, golf isn't fair--get over it. If you are playing a game for millions (or hundreds of thousands) of dollars, is it too much to expect a rudimentary knowledge of that game? The horror of being held responsible for one's actions!!! I guess if you can get away with a violation (unintentional though it may be) you are good? Benseatlle does not seem to have a real strong handle on the rules as there are very specific timelines as to when a player is still held accountable for a Rule violation.

Fat golfers have a greater chance of getting casual water relief than lighter golfers. Golfers who play with large galleries have some more distractions but how many lost balls have Tiger Woods or Jack Nicklaus ever endured thanks to those same large galleries. How many times have galleries prevented balls from rolling into worse spots thanks to them acting as human "fences". It's an outdoor game played over various conditions and at different times of the day--nothing will be exactly the same of "fair". That is part of what makes the game great.

One last point to benseattle--how do you differentiate between intentional and unintentional? I agree that it does not appear that the player in this case was trying "to cheat" but can we really know? If TV caught a player cheating (like when the Senior Tour caught Bob Toski through "non traditional survelliance") do you act then? I assume so but how do you determine intent?

Rule 6-1--the player and his caddie are responsible for knowing the Rules. Pretty simple.

If you don't know the Rules and/or break them, you are responsible no matter how that violation comes to light.
11.17.2012 | Unregistered CommenterChris
Know what makes for an unlevel playing field? When some players drop according to the rules, and others dont.
11.17.2012 | Unregistered Commenterbret
Being 6'3' I've found that shoulder height is not to my advantage. I prefer to play unplayable lies as a result. Ms Yoo was close to "placing" the ball from where I sit. Don't like the rules, lobby to change them.
11.17.2012 | Unregistered CommenterAverage Golfer
Does anyone know why the method of dropping was changed in the first place? The old farts here will remember that the ball had to be dropped over your shoulder, behind you. This alone stopped any chance of trying to drop the ball on a particular spot.
11.17.2012 | Unregistered CommenterPeter Norrie
Wow, Ben. Bad week.

If anyone remembers, a couple of people asking me, ''what are some examples of rules changes I would make''- one of the changes would be that the ball would be PLACED- no'' 2 drops, and then place where it last ''landed'' as to be determined--- what BS and a waste of time- PLACE THE BALL- equal to all, regardless of height- no BS ball rolling into the hazard, ob, cart path, yda, yada...PLACE THE BALL, AND LETS PLAY GOLF!

Alleged ''purists'' will gripe, but so what- they gripe about everything.

And as to twitters, phone ins, etc.... DISREGARD ''RULE INFRACTION'' AND CHARGE CALLER WITH A CRIMINAL MISCHIEF PHONE CALL.
11.17.2012 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
You go, Digs!

Peter: I was told that the old way was discontinued so that the ball wouldn't strike the player on the way to its new destination. Makes a certain sense. But now you do have players "practicing" their drop technique. LOL.

Tighthead is right. She is lucky she signed for the correct score.

Wiziwig has failed me. No Australian Masters without some hinky download. Alas. But I did see Tech beat Duke, and they are in contention for their ACC Division, at 6-7 after the Georgia game next week. What a freakin' joke is college football. But there is this: Ducks get plucked by a cardinal in a spruce tree, Wildcats get eaten by Bears. Next thing you know, Georgia beats Alabama in Atlanta and repeats the 1981 Sugar Bowl result in January 2013. ;-)
11.17.2012 | Unregistered CommenterKLG
Benny Boy Seattle,

If I wasn't having to tap away on a dang iPad I would have bothered to explain to you the "statute of limitations" within the Rules (Rule 34-2)....

Also, you don't understand R13-3 very well regarding building a stance.

Off you go and play your tourneys sonny.
11.17.2012 | Unregistered CommenterTrysil
Totally ridiculous situation and it shouldn't have ever gotten to where twits start twitting and telling on someone else.

1) The player (Sun Young) was crazy to try hitting out of the love grass in the first place
2) It appears from the video that more than a few people were around, and assuming at least ONE person knew or was aware that you must drop the ball from shoulder height (didn't Wie once get dairy-queened for the same poor drop technique?)...how come someone didn't just yell or scream say "STOP Sun Young!!!" or "LOOK OUT FOR THAT SNAKE!!" or. whatever?? The infraction/resolution should have been handled on-site quite easily.

Come on people attending/working/volunteering in a tournament...grow a set! Don't always assume just because someone can play professionally that they're not above making basic rule blunders or even oblivious to simple drop procedures. I know some touring pros who don't even know where to start when dropping from GUR, cartpaths, etc...they have to call a rules official to ask if it's OK to pee.
11.18.2012 | Unregistered Commenterjohnnnycz
She was obviously shook up, having lost one stroke already, and honestly, as short as she is, it may have looked like she was holding her arm correctly to (most) people, who were taller than her.

If the ball could be placed, per David's ROG, then none of this would have happened.

As to callers, tey should be charged. as per previous post.
11.18.2012 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
What I love about all these "rules experts" is that they're the exact same geniuses who: improve their lies, accept gimmees, hit mulligans, use a putting ball, ignore stroke and distance, ask "what club did you hit there?" change ball brands at mid-round and generally play golf the way the rest of us do.... For Fun. For those who Actually Care about the point of my original post, my opinion continues to assert that rules decisions should be made by those actually ON the golf course -- not by some Poindexter living life in a Barcalounger ready to pounce should they deliciously sniff a violation.

And for the record, kids? I've NEVER have a bad week. :-)
11.18.2012 | Unregistered Commenterbenseattle
''And for the record, kids? I've NEVER have a bad week. :-)''

Darn, Ben. I am a jack of all trades; please consider me for your ''the shit has hit the fan'' crew. What You don't luck out of, I can probably fix.

dig
11.18.2012 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
Ben,

FWIW I think the rules should be bifurcated. Actually, 99.9% of golfers don't play by the rules anyway like you mentioned and we already have de facto bifurcation--and I am perfectly fine with that--there are too many rules and people should have FUN like you say.

BUT, I do expect the 1/2 of 1% who play for a living to be held to a higher standard.
11.18.2012 | Unregistered CommenterChris
If I were competing in a televised tournament and committed a rules infraction that was seen by viewers, I would not want it to be ignored by anyone. If I were to go on and win the tournament and have video to look at for the rest of my life, then I would feel as if I had cheated. I don’t care who might call it in.

Paul Azinger moved (kicked) loose impediments in a hazard at Doral one year, and he made the same complaints that others here have made about some jerk in a recliner watching TV thousands of miles away being able to penalize him.

That incident just made me lose more respect for Paul, and made a good point about his character.
11.18.2012 | Unregistered CommenterJesse Pinkman

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