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« Hanson Hopes To Retire By 38 And Other Anecdotes About The Masters 3rd Round Leader | Main | Obama's Record On Female Golfing Partners Questioned »
Sunday
Apr082012

Sergio's Post 3rd Round Meltdown: "I'm not good enough."

Thanks to the Augusta Chronicle's Scott Michaux for translating and Tweeting Sergio Garcia's post third round 75 comments to the Spanish press.**  Garry Smits filed the full story here and you can see the quotes in context. He's still melting down.

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Reader Comments (20)

During the post-round interview, didn't he & Rory look like naughty schoolboys in the Headmaster's office!

Sounds like a mental problem, low self-esteem etc. "Get your mind right, Serg, feel the force."

So many reasons to be cheerful.
04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterMacDuff
I look at this as typical dejection after an inexplicable bad round, particularly after intense desire to perform well in such an important event.
Garcia is undoubtedly capable of winning a major, just as Phil was capable after so many failures prior to his 2004 Masters win at age 33 (n.b. Sergio is 32 at present).
04.8.2012 | Unregistered Commentergov. lepetomane
I would say those comments are Sergio's defense mechanism kicking in. Self-effacing after a poor performance is common among athletes. He certainly has the talent to win anytime, anywhere, when his game is on. I witnessed his and McIlroy's consoling each other at the end as sort of a "misery loves company" moment. McIlroy's melt-down was worse than Sergio's melt-down, but not sure that qualifies as good news to anyone.

It will be interesting to see how each performs on Sunday - either they muster up some courage and try and but a nice, little bow on it - or if they leave town with their week's performance savagely tattered and torn. Neither are playing next week at Hilton Head so the question is do they try and leave on a high-note, or just go thorugh the motions in the 4th round and simply sulk out of town with Saturday's debacle being the story for their week's work in Augusta.
Shows how much he wants it.
No Longer Used to be Former S&T convert,
Your statement shows how little you know about professional sports of any kind.

Porky is correct. Self-effacing is a part of the mindset of a professional golfer. I've seen it up close and first hand and in truth, Sergio is telling the truth in that he isn't good enough. At least right now.

04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterBuddha
If he beats on himself, other will do it less. Psych 101
04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterGolfFan
I may know a little more than you think. Buddha. Been inside the ropes, on the bag, more than a few times. Not arguing with Porky, either, he is right. Wanting it too much, trying too hard are common mistakes that prevent a player from playing loose, see: Greg Norman. I am a Sergio fan, btw.
Actually most great athletes, while they may be self effacing, are eternal optimists. They constantly believe they will make the next shot, post a good score the next round etc, and tend to have great selective memories, depending on what they need at the moment. They have a huge amount of self belief. This is sort of the oppisote of that.
04.8.2012 | Unregistered Commenterelf
Never seen Sergio look particularly happy, other than the heel kick and fairway sprint a long time ago. May have depression issues.
04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterAverage Golfer
This guy using the Buddha handle has got to go. What a disgrace. His comments are only negative. Clearly he is mired in samsara.
04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterAd Hominem
@ elf

I agree re: eternal optimist. The self-effacing usually takes place immediately following a poor performance though. As GolfFan eluded to, if they beat on themselves first, perhaps others will do so less and ask fewer questions. When an athlete performs poorly, they want to "get out there" as quickly as possible - they don't like having to answer questions as to why they didn't live up to our expectations so they throw out some self-effacing to the masses to sort of 'get it over with'.

Any and all great athletes - and I reserve the term great for those that excel at the highest level in any sports, are ALL eternal optimists when it comes to their own self-confidence. But, that said, they too will engage in self-effacing from time to time. Having played with many world-class golfers and Hall of Famers, I don't know one serious golfer that doesn't engage in self-effacing from time to time.
Confidence is the most precious and elusive attribute that any golfer can possess - which golfer will have the most confidence going to the 1st tee today and be able to maintain it through thick and thin? Obviously, not Sergio.
04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterIvan Morris
At least he's won The Players (Championship)... but sounds like it's just not the same to him... nor to anyone else.
04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterJohn C
Is his girlfriend at the event with him? The state of affairs in that area seems to dictate Sergio's mental fortitude, or lack thereof, at any given time.
04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterBarista
Agree with Barista; no bird, no birdies..
04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterTim in Hoylake
@ Ad Hominem: well played.

I fully expect Garcia to own golf in his 40s. 20s and 30s are overrated when it comes to golf performance. He just has to allow his youthful volitality to run its course. His mid-30s career will be something to watch. We don't all peak at 22.
04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterDG
"A man has got to know his limitations." - Clint
04.8.2012 | Unregistered CommenterJMH
If Sergio was willing to be totally honest he would likely say that the reason he has not won a major is lack of breaks. Everyone else(especially Tiger) has gotten the breaks and for some reason he has not. Now it appears he has allowed that belief to be substitued by the fact he "has no more options". He is difficult to understand (and frankly I think most golf fans no longer care to try).
Sergio returned a very respectable 71 in Sunday's final round. If he didn't care, he could have 'mailed in' a 75 or 77 and hit the road. I give him a thumbs up for finishing on a high-note at -2 for the week and a very respectable T-12. His final round 71 began with a double-bogey on the first hole.

One of the most unfortuante stories is the brilliant -8 under 64 posted by Bo Van Pelt was in the end one shot shy of getting Bo into the magic top 16 and ties that provides an anutomoatic return invite in 2013.

He should qualify easily to get an invite for next year based on his his good play this year (4 top 10's) and he should easlity stay well inside the OWGR's Top 50. Van Pellt's Master's week moved him up to 27th from 28th so that should be no problem for him making his reservations for next year in Augusta.

His consolation prize(s) for the week is an armful of crystal - Low Round on Sunday (Vase), Hole-in-one #16 (Bowl), and the Eagle 3 on #13 (pair of goblets) - a pretty good haul on top of his check for $124,000 to boot. Virtually all of winnings and haul were the result of his remarkable 30 fired during Sunday's final round.
04.9.2012 | Unregistered CommenterTheProfromDover
Apparently in Sergio's case, petulance is ageless, because he's sure hanging onto it. Which is a shame, because one speculates that he might be a lot batter if he'd get his head on straight. Learning how to putt under pressure might help too...
04.9.2012 | Unregistered Commentertlavin

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