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Monday
Jan142013

If We Could All Keep Our Right Foot Down This Long...

Callaway Kid is five, someone is tweeting for him, and I'm jealous watching this swing...

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Reader Comments (12)

Sorry, but will somebody explain to me the dramatic advantages of keeping your right foot down a long time? Every great player I've ever watched either ROLLS the right foot (following the right knee) toward the target as part of the weight shift. Staying on the right side accomplishes WHAT, exactly?

Oh, and while it's a decent swing for a five-year-old, I see nothing stylistically to get excited about. Sorry, kid, check back with Geoff in another five years. He'll be even MORE impressed. :-)
01.14.2013 | Unregistered CommenterBenSeattle
Well, it's all relative. If you saw my right foot rolling up to the tip-toe position before impact, you'd understand!

Some empathy, please!

it's more that the great ones keep it down just long enough...not flat footed, just low and with a slight forward push.
01.14.2013 | Registered CommenterGeoff
He's a stack and tilter. He'll quit before he's nine in frustration.
01.14.2013 | Unregistered CommenterAnchorman
Ben Seattle
Maybe you could bring the snark down a few notches--he's 5! Geezuss! You get no "style" points in any of your posts!
01.15.2013 | Unregistered CommenterMike S.
He might want to consider finding someone else to handle his tweets for him. Nothing but begging celebrities and professional athletes for retweets. I'd get tired of seeing that in my feed in no time.
01.15.2013 | Unregistered CommenterTom D
Great swing.

The 1800 tweets, the manufactured nickname and strategically placed Callaway bag in the video give me some cause for concern.
I'm a lefty. so al this ''right foor'' stuff is my left foot (wow, sounds like a great name or a movie!). HOWEVER for the sake of the right handed/ right swinging golf world,
I am going to address all this as if I were a right hander. Everybody ot that?

Take your right golf shoe, and
1. remove all the inner spikes, or
2put new large spikes and the outside side, and old or smaller spikes on the inside side.

You have now pre-loaded your leg/foot for a better drive in yor swing....it works.
01.15.2013 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
@Digs -

I thought we weren't supposed to let weight drift onto the outside of the rear foot? I have my rear knee bent, and it stays that way throughout the swing - all the weight/pressure is on the 'inside" (towards target) of the knee.
01.15.2013 | Unregistered CommenterPepperdine
<< BenSeattle, You get no "style" points in any of your posts! >>

No...none of them? You didn't like "I'd rather eat a peanut butter and sewage sandwich" used elsewhere?

Aw hell..... I guess I'll never become the next Nikki Finke.
01.15.2013 | Unregistered CommenterBenSeattle
Pepperdine-- the dscribed setup with the shoe puts the weight on the inside of the foot, as you wanted.

Bigger spikes on the outside/ smaller, or no spikes on the inside tilts your rear foot to the front.
01.15.2013 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
@Digs -

Makes total sense now, thanks. I think my True Tour shoes are attempting to accomplish the same thing.
01.15.2013 | Unregistered CommenterPepperdine
Great swing
Bad grip
01.15.2013 | Unregistered CommenterPABoy

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