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Sunday
Jun292014

1-In-5.7-Million: Aces On Back-To-Back Days

Many thanks to reader Alexandra for this stellar Joe Avento story on Dean McPherson, who made two aces in 24 hours, one with a PW and another with a hybrid (and with witnesses). Both came at Tennessee’s Johnson City Country Club.

Avento writes:

Saturday’s ace came at the seventh hole, and the ball took a little turn on a hill on the green before falling. The 4-hyrbid shot went 180 yards. Steve Myers, Tyler Larsen and Arch Jones witnessed the ace.

“We all talked it in,” McPherson said. “We were talking to it the whole way. It actually paused for a second on the side before we saw it tip over.

“I was like ‘There’s no way this is happening twice,’ ” he said.

McPherson said his buddies’ reactions were what made it such a special occasion. They threw their clubs in the air to celebrate the unlikely feat.

“When I turned around, seeing their faces was were as cool as seeing the ball going in,” he said. “We all threw our clubs in the air. If we had a video, we could sell it.”

Jones was about to hit next, so he had a club in one hand and a tee and ball in the other. He threw them all in celebration.

“I had to go find everything before I could hit,” he said. “It was really something.”

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Reader Comments (9)

Good story-
what are the odds against the woman at Chatswood Golf Course in Sydney Australia in the 70's I think who had holes in one on consecutive holes in the same round? 13th and 14th I think it was. A shortish course par 67 or something but amazing.
If the odds are 5.7 million to one it would take 11.4 million rounds since two rounds are needed to achieve the feat.
06.30.2014 | Unregistered CommenterAbu Dhabi Golfer
Colin, if you assume an amateur makes an ace about once every 12,500 holes the odds of consecutive aces would be about 1/156,250,000. (I think;)
06.30.2014 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
Congratulations, and , uh, congratulations.
06.30.2014 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
well, at Donald Ross's part time home at Sakonnet Golf Club in Sakonnet RI, I had my first hole in one, on the #2 180 yd par 3, a four iron. The 6th hole a 213 yd par three, I scored my second hole in one, this using a 3 iron. So the two were separated by about 20 minutes. I wrote to golf digest at the time, curious of how often that happened. GD responded, 'more often than you think, at least several times a year'. The club generously displayed my scorecard for many years after that. Nice folks. Thanks, George Truscott.

So if you imagine that the odds were about 156 million/1 I shoulda gone to play the horses that day.
06.30.2014 | Unregistered Commenterchip gow
Better than making two aces is being able to play at such a torrid pace (if chip's aces were separated by 20 minutes)!
06.30.2014 | Unregistered CommenterCarl Peterson
Chip, what Colin described was aces on consecutive swings/holes. Wonder how many courses there are that even have consecutive par 3's?
06.30.2014 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
Quicken Loans should get involved in this.
06.30.2014 | Unregistered CommenterDonald Luke
In the mid 80's, Arnold Palmer also had back to back aces, 24 hours apart in a pro-am. Same hole for good measure. Must be nice, I'm having some difficulty just getting one in the books.
06.30.2014 | Unregistered CommenterPJ

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