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    Lines of Charm: Brilliant And Irreverent Quotes, Notes, And Anecdotes from Golf's Golden Age Architects
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    The Future of Golf: How Golf Lost Its Way and How to Get It Back
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    Grounds for Golf: The History and Fundamentals of Golf Course Design
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    The Golden Age of Golf Design
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    The Good Doctor Returns: A Novel
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    Masters of the Links: Essays on the Art of Golf and Course Design
  • The Captain: George C. Thomas Jr. and His Golf Architecture
    The Captain: George C. Thomas Jr. and His Golf Architecture
    by Geoff Shackelford
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    The Forbidden Game: Golf and the Chinese Dream
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    Arnie, Seve, and a Fleck of Golf History: Heroes, Underdogs, Courses, and Championships
    by Bill Fields
  • The Magnificent Masters: Jack Nicklaus, Johnny Miller, Tom Weiskopf, and the 1975 Cliffhanger at Augusta
    The Magnificent Masters: Jack Nicklaus, Johnny Miller, Tom Weiskopf, and the 1975 Cliffhanger at Augusta
    by Gil Capps
  • His Ownself: A Semi-Memoir
    His Ownself: A Semi-Memoir
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  • Golf Architecture in America: Its Strategy and Construction
    Golf Architecture in America: Its Strategy and Construction
    by Geo. C. Thomas
  • The Course Beautiful : A Collection of Original Articles and Photographs on Golf Course Design
    The Course Beautiful : A Collection of Original Articles and Photographs on Golf Course Design
    Treewolf Prod
  • Reminiscences Of The Links
    Reminiscences Of The Links
    by Albert Warren Tillinghast, Richard C. Wolffe, Robert S. Trebus, Stuart F. Wolffe
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    Gleanings from the Wayside
    by Albert Warren Tillinghast
  • Planet Golf USA: The Definitive Reference to Great Golf Courses in America
    Planet Golf USA: The Definitive Reference to Great Golf Courses in America
    by Darius Oliver
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    Planet Golf: The Definitive Reference to Great Golf Courses Outside the United States of America
    by Darius Oliver
Writing And Videos
« Video: Cabrera's 175-Yard Hole-Out In Greenbrier Win | Main | Video: Why Players Fuss With Their Lines Files, Stroud Edition »
Sunday
Jul062014

“I’d be over a putt and she’s going through my head.”

Heartbreaking news from Sunday's Greenbrier Classic where George McNeill somehow posted a 61 and nearly stole the tournament, all while playing with the knowledge that his 46-year-old sister Michelle was about to pass away from cancer.

After finishing his round, the bad news came in a phone call to his mom Dorothy, but mercifully, Angel Cabrera won by two strokes and McNeill didn't have to regroup for a playoff. Still, he hung around to talk about Michelle and his family saga of the last year.

Jason Sobel tells McNeill's story. Don't miss it.

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Reader Comments (10)

Wow. Just awful. Well done by Sobel.
07.6.2014 | Unregistered CommenterBrianS
It's nice to think that maybe she was with him.
07.6.2014 | Unregistered CommenterPat
Stories like this are what makes golf different, that is, the special people who play it. George McNeill is one of those special people
07.6.2014 | Unregistered CommenterSweet Ol' Bob
Extremely sad, listening to him speak after his round was tear jerking to say the least.
07.6.2014 | Unregistered CommenterPress Agent
Always watch out for the sick--or saddened--golfer. Weiskopf tearing that Champions Tour event apart after his buddy, Bert Yance, died of a heart attack earlier in the week was similar..
07.6.2014 | Unregistered CommenterCrusher
Very moving and beyond impressive.
07.7.2014 | Unregistered Commentertlavin
That's a "flow state" no one wants to replicate.
4-4-3-3-3-3-3-1-4 = 28

That was his card on the front nine.

My Dad taught me to add up a scorecard really fast by quickly scanning it in either direction and counting how many strokes under "5" a player was on each hole, and then subtracting that total from 45 or 90 depending on whether you are checking 9 holes or 18.

From that I started to think about a round of golf (keep in mind I'm not very good) that way, how many under 5's am I"? After 8 holes that dude was already 16 under 5's, he coulda made 5 on every hole going forward and still shot 74! Those guys really are good. (I'm pretty sure he didn't make a single 5 all day)

Condolences to the family....
07.7.2014 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
My Mom taught me the same method, DTF. I still use it, though sadly these days it's more often, 'How many over 5s am I?'.
07.7.2014 | Unregistered Commenterdbh
Bless her and him and his family.

That is quite a card, and an interesting way of scoring, Del. I write 0 for par, and 1 for a bogie, -1 circled for a bird, etc. I also do not keep score while I play, except in tournaments.

Peter did a nice job in a delicate interview, and the pain was just awful. I wish them all well, and peace. It is nice that he wanted to be with her kids right away. We have all been there, where children are shortchanged having a full life with their folks. An uncle can help.
07.7.2014 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth

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