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Saturday
Aug192017

U.S. Amateur At Riviera Final Is Set: Ghim v. Redman

Better work today Angelenos on the attendance front! You were treated to a pair of U.S. Amateur semi-finals that reached the 17th and 18th holes. Remember, you park for free at Paul Revere Junior High and can get a free shuttle ride to the club next door, so no excuses for skipping out on a chance to walk the perfect kikuyu fairways at Riviera.

Plus, you'll be treated to the joys of match play, which includes strategizing, emotions and other micro-dramas that you won't enjoy just watching on television.It just so happens that you'll also be treated to some world-class golf is Saturday's semi's are any indication. Doug Ghim defeated Theo Humphrey 2&1 and Doc Redman beat Mark Lawrence 1 up, setting up Sunday's 36-hole finale at Hogan's Alley.

Brentley Romine at Golfweek.com writes of Ghim's emotional swings in defeating the feisty Humphrey.

The dramatic win, which also gets him in the U.S. Open should Ghim remain an amateur, comes just a few years after a near-miss at the U.S. Amateur Public Links that cost the Texas golf team member a Masters invitation.

Ryan Lavner with that side of the final story for GolfChannel.com.

The quality of the golf has been solid to ridiculously good given the stakes and difficulty of Riviera. USGA Highlights from the Ghim and Redman wins.

Kids take note: both finalists wore pants in their semi-final wins. Meet them here in this USGA video.

Official image galleries from the matches, which capture some of the proceedings played under perfect conditions.

Sadly Fox Sports 1 has Bundesliga Soccer to air Sunday morning (priorities!), so the first 18 of Gihm v. Redman is only viewable on USGA.org.

The afternoon round coverage begins at 4:30 pm ET on big Fox.

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Reader Comments (20)

Well, not to quibble but I will about the order of invitations. I'll bet a bunk in the Crow's Nest and the chance to rub elbows with some of the legends of the game holds a helluva lot more appeal than the U.S. Open. I hope I'm still alive for the day the Tour approaches ANGC to change its tournament date to accommodate another schedule abomination for the sake of ratings. Good luck to both contestants, not so much the Tour.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterD. maculata
The two 3 woods hit by Lawrence and Doc were as fine consecutive shots I have seen. That one foot advantage gave Lawrence the line but what a putt he hit! This is golf not to be missed if today follows suit.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterTaffy
Great golf and the Fox coverage has been surprisingly good. It's nice this weekend on the east coast, but man CA has some beautiful cloudless days.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterCheeks
Love this event and the coverage, but I think the course setup took away from it. Greens firmness is over the top.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterJeremy
"You can talk to a fade, but a hook won't listen."

Redman momentum on 12th.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterFC
I attended last year's event at Oakland Hills, and the crowds were much bigger than at Riviera. The marshalls had to use ropes in the fairways to contain the crowds all weekend. Not just for the final, but for the Luck/Carlson semifinal as well. Maybe it was due to the fact that Carlson was a U of M golfer, but the 21-hole match was very exciting as well. I attended the quarterfinals as well, and the crowds were sizable. The U.S. Amateur has always been my favorite event to attend. I was at the Pinehurst event as well. You are close to the players, and the crowds are smaller, which make for excellent spectating.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterSmitty
USA has played great in the Solheim Cup. I'm sure if the Presidents Cup was going on, there would be no mention of it either, because of the US Amateur.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterH. Montgomery
Both players, Doctors of Greens.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterFC
Can't help thinking, Why do we need 36 holes?
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterFC
don't need 36 holes
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterZimmer
Sadly there appears to be no way of watching this in the UK. Sky not showing it and the streaming is blocked in the UK. Shame!
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterRob S
Is there a bigger turnout than at the Sr Open?
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterZimmer
Something to consider since the beauty and vitality of match play is under discussion here.

I say that watching play at this year's stroke play style U.S. PGA, which featured 4 days of golf over a super long 7,600+ yard course containing significantly constricted fairways hemmed in by super tough rough and fast, Fast, FAST greens, was incredibly BORING! I simply don't want to watch this kind of play any longer as it forces me to co-dependently watch great golfers undergo what honestly feels like a sadistic rite. Spiritually, that's not a good place. Can't we all accept that such demonically torturous tests of golf skill are a long-standing characteristic of, and should be reserved to, U.S. Open events where all golfers (and fans) expect, in advance, an interesting encounter with golf hell on earth?

So why should the rotation of the ought-to-be-Grander U.S. PGA golf courses subserviently emulate the U.S. Open's design setup style? I say it shouldn't and I am hereby offering a fix-it solution that's all about making the PGA the most unique positive buzz creating tournament in the golf world. Here's how:

1. Return the PGA ASAP to its historic match play roots (with a 36 hole two-day show-up-and-kick-butt-or-shut-up-and go-home stroke play qualifier with low 64 golfers advancing to the "traditional" 36-hole Final. All by itself, this would make the PGA different from any other Grand Slam tournament; and I don't care what time of the year they play it.

2. Make the tournament a super crowd-pleasing shoot-out style of golf by playing it on a sub-7,000 yard layout with modest rough and greens stimped at around 10.

3. And, because sub-7,000 yard courses would now be the new norm at the PGA, go the extra exciting yard (pun intended) and make it a "small bag" tournament for the players where the maximum number of clubs is restricted to 10 as are all club lofts under 14 degrees (but keep currently sanctioned ball and club characteristics). Note: A few players can hit 5-woods a long way so 280+ drives won't entirely disappear but pros will need to wield significantly more long- and mid-irons into, hopefully, receptive greens.. I think this format and type of play would promote a crowd pleasing birdie-fest; a viewer's delight that would allow a wider range of top pro talent the chance to shine.

This radical approach to Grand Slam golf, the yin in every way to the U.S. Open's opposite pole yang, would IMMEDIATELY create BIG BUZZ for the PGA and revitalize its ebbing cachet. Not only would that tournament's historic match play origin be recalled and honored, but, at the same time, the PGA would signal to all concerned that shorter world-class golf courses will still have a truly significant place in pro golfing's Grand Slam rota.

Of course, some would argue that modern use of a sub-7,000 yard Grand Slam course set up to promote MATCH PLAY ACTION GOLF (i.e., birdie golf) would not inspire or promote the needed "test" that a Grand Slam event requires. To that I say, au contraire, mon ami!

I would strongly argue, instead, that adoption of the old U.S. PGA Tournament system featuring an initial 2-round stroke play qualifier followed by 64 golfers duking it out in a single elimination match play event, wherein semi-finalists would each face at least one day of double rounds, and the winner emerging from a grueling 36 hole final, would be, in every year, by far the STERNEST Grand Slam golfing test. In some years, the eventually finalists could play over 200 holes of golf!! How much harder can you possibly make it for modern professionals? So you help them a little by shortening the layout and by giving them few less clubs to think about and you make 'em happy by making every hole a realistic shot at birdie.

And really, what would you get? A brand new, nothing-like-it, truly historically minded, U.S. PGA Tournament, that tries really hard to excite the pros, the fan base, and wonderfully promotes, through use of the sub 7,000 yard course and the match play system, a modern day appreciation of what "old school" golf was all about. What do you think Hogan, Snead, Nelson, Runyan, Sarazen and Hagen would think about this?
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterDavid
The hell is the "US" PGA Championship? It's just the PGA Championship you dolt.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterLarry Lurker
Melvyn has a brother!

36 holes in the final is perfect.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterKLG
Good showing, Doug, and way to represent UT! Hook 'em Horns!
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterRickABQ
"Kids take note: both finalists wore pants in their semi-final wins."

Yes, both very very good little boys who wouldn't dare be so saucy as to leave their calves exposed, and who will make exemplary members of the Mennonite PGA Tour someday!
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterShort Knocker
@ FC & Zimmer: A match like today is why 36 holes is better than 18. After all, if the players are really hot, why would you want to deny yourself an extra 18 holes to watch great golf? On top of that, the possibility of extra holes? I watched the match today thinking that it can't can any better than this, and then it did. Repeatedly. Great viewing!
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterSmitty
Is there a bigger stooge in golf than Mike Yamaki standing almost on the green for the 37th hole of the U.S. Amateur and trying to get in all the camera shots? Great job USGA.

Awesome event otherwise. What players.
08.20.2017 | Unregistered CommenterLA Guy
Smitty, it was great viewing, but the result was the same as after 18 holes. 36 hole finals are archaic, from an age when there was nothing better to do than listen to a radio. Incredulously, many State golf associations still adopt this marathon format. I don't think it's going anywhere soon, though I wish it would disappear.

The USGA should also ditch the 18 hole playoff (if needed) the day after the US Open, and find another solution, as the other majors have. Cheers!
08.21.2017 | Unregistered CommenterFC

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