"Bear that in mind the next time a so-called expert pops up to claim that Tiger's Butch Harmon swing, circa 2002, is better than the Hank Haney-produced method that he uses these days."

In his Sunday column, John Huggan points out Tiger's dominance on the European Tour.

As a professional he has played in 77 European Tour events, 32 ending in victory to give him an amazing strike rate of 41.56%. In four of every five appearances he has finished in the top ten, and in six of every ten he has made the top three. Along the way he has won €35,166,588, an average of €456,709 every time that he has teed up - never mind any appearance money that he has trousered courtesy of grateful sponsors.

All of which renders ridiculous the almost compulsory and oh-so predictable pro-Rose drumbeating that has resounded as the England media's darling takes an admittedly significant step towards real stardom. Having won only six events in his nine-year professional career - none on the PGA Tour - and only now made it into the world's top-ten players, Rose is still a million miles from the exalted level that Woods has scaled.

While the former child star did extraordinarily well to record top-12 finishes in each of this year's four major championships, a quick look at more numbers reveals that his four-event aggregate was 16 shots worse than that returned by Woods. In other words, Rose has to find one shot per round if he is to challenge the great man in the events that are the genuine measure of any career.

That's an enormous gap in professional terms.

The further bad news for those deranged individuals still harbouring ambitions to challenge Woods in the near future is that the American continues to improve at the age of 31, even with a driver in his hands - the area of the game in which he is perceived by many ignorant judges to be uncharacteristically weak.

A couple of weeks ago, this column ran figures revealing how almost every top player has grown longer and less accurate off the tee over the past five years. While this is true of Woods, his numbers show that, relative to almost every one of his nearest 'challengers' on the world-ranking list, he is better than he was in 2002. Bear that in mind the next time a so-called expert pops up to claim that Tiger's Butch Harmon swing, circa 2002, is better than the Hank Haney-produced method that he uses these days.