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Wednesday
Oct312012

Keegan To Take Some Sort Of Stand Against Anchoring Ban

I'm not sure from these comments if this means he's going to write a juicy letter, picket outside Golf House, start a Facebook page, give USGA walking officials that creepy glazed-eye look he gets before hitting a putt, or, file a big lawsuit. But it seems Keegan Bradley is going to take a stand against the inevitable USGA/R&A ban on anchoring putters against the torso.

He's talking exclusively to Alex Miceli in Dongguan, China:

“I'm going to do whatever I have to do to protect myself and the other players on Tour,” Bradley said. “I look at it as a whole, as us all together. I don't look at it as much about myself. I think that for them to ban this after we've done what we've done is unbelievable.”

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Reader Comments (73)

Keegan that's "lewd, lascivious, salacious, outrageous!" Be prepared to be disowned by many! But not me, I'm sticking with you bro....your Young Gun status remains intact.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
I'm not sticking with you, bro, dude or buddy. It's unseemly to see a young, talented player leaning on his putter. Quit whining and start putting fair and square.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commentertlavin
It should have been banned 20 years ago. To ban it now is totally stupid.
Long putters are not to blame for the issues in the game today, it is length that is the issue. This has increased the cost for the average golfer as well as golf course owners and investors.
The R&A and USGA are going for the soft target rather than the right target.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterTroublelove
Troublelove++
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterBlue Canyon
It makes no sense that a player of Bradley's talents can master every aspect of the golf swing except the easiest one. Spend some time on the practice green, Keegan; that's your answer.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterJeff Smith
Troublelove,
You are correct in that it is not "the" issue in the game today.
But it is one of the many issues that needs to be corrected.
The R&A and USGA have let many facets of the game get out of hand.
That they are aiming for any target is a start.

"may the lie be with you"
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterQrispy2
''creepy glazed-eye look''

Which he has more often than not. Evil.

~I'm~ gonna~ sue~ na na na na na na na~ Pulleazze.

Putt like a man, you wimp. Get over your old man crutch.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
I still haven't heard a logical explanation of why something that's been legal forever all of a sudden isn't ok anymore....anyone?
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
DTF - I'm with you... There's no statistical evidence that this is a superior method to putting (at least not on the PGA Tour) so someone please explain logically why it should be banned. And, if you strike a modern golf ball with a Titanium headed driver that is more than 360 cc's you are automatically disqualified from offering an explanation.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commentere9golf
I'm starting to think that the anti long-putter crowd is drinking a little too much hater-ade these days. The reasoning used for the ban is weak at best. The only valid argument for it would be "because we said so!". Sports rules are arbitrary by nature, admit to it and move on, but the blah, blah, blah makes the USGA and the R&A look ridiculous.

BTW, can anyone else picture the Bradley-Mickelson pow-wow or advice sessions that may have taken place with regards to this issue. Keegan's quotes sound like pure Mick-elese to me.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterNC Phyllis
You don't know how much of an advantage the long putter is unless you've had the yips - it's impossible for the left wrist to break down at impact with the belly putter. Part of the spirit of the game is that a 300-yard drive counts the same as a two-foot putt, but that nerves can make the two-footer the more difficult shot to execute under certain circumstances. I don't give a rat's ass about statistical evidence, to me it's all about controlling your hands in stressful situations. In these situations, the long putter is an advantage of enormous proportions.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterHawkeye
Anchoring is not swinging. It creates a fulcrum which lends support at a pivot point for a lever to move. Takes some of the nerve element out of the challenge of holing putts the closer an anchorer gets to the hole. Not all but certainly some. Just ask Adam Scott.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterAmen Coroner
sue baby sue

im sure the usga counsel is taking into consideration the lawsuits from mfgs, but players?
Hawkeye - I would counter by saying that one doesn't know how much of an advantage big headed drivers are to those who struggle off the tee. A 300 by Greg/Jack, etc. in 1986 was a lot more impressive than Ryan Palmer averaging 303.

A crucial tee shot, with persimmon and a Tour Balata used to take just as much nerve as any 3 footer.

Or hybrids?! Take a look at "War by the Shore" , half of those poor shots (hello Calc) are nearly not possible with current equipment.

It's the wrong battle, easier to win because of the minority use, but still the wrong fight to pick. IMO
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterNC Phyllis
A lawsuit has no chance. It is a rules issue, no court can rule on that. Just because you can't putt it isn't automaticall a discrimination against disadvantaged people.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterRyan
I think AC has the essence of this particular debate. The long putter should never have been allowed because the golfer does not "swing" the putter, it is "anchored".

At the same time, the biggest issue with the pro game is clearly distance and there is a great deal of smoke and mirrors here. The USGA is effectively impacting the career of a (growing) handful of TOUR players who use the long putter, instead of doing something about the golf ball or the driver heads that would impact the entire field.

Putting is a crucial aspect of the pro game and it is likely that guys like Keegan, Webb, Carl, Tim Clark, etc. will fall off the map if they have to go back to a standard putter.

I do not think the long putter should ever have been allowed, at least on the PGA TOUR, but seriously, start with the big issues with statistical evidence (distance and courses getting ruined to combat it) and then move to smaller issues like this.
Anchoring is just NOT golf.

And he can get rid of his back and fro preshot routine too.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterStanley Thompson
Cry me a river, Keegan.
Start your own tour if you don't like it- you can call it the Tourettes Tour.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commenterjjshaka
I'm with Hawkeye

Nobody is forcing Keegan to play golf for a living.

I'm also with Phyllis - bring back balata
Bradley personifies the elements of "the new golf" that are offensive. From his whining now about someone taking away his putting crutch to his autistic rocking in his pre-shot routines and the evil eye before raising the crutch to putt, it's all a bit grotesque -- especially when compared to the freshness of the young classic type players like Rory. The stutter step in and back out is reminiscent of an OCD patient having to check and re-check that a door is locked... When all of it was punctuated by compulsive spitting, we had a shining example of what we don't need golf to turn into with this generation.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterRLL
Everyone who CONSTANTLY bring up the larger headed clubs and the ball should understand that this is not about those issues, it is about the putter/stroke/anchoring.

I don't think anyone here is unwilling to discuss the big head/ball longer drive/need (or not) for longer course issue- BUT NOT HERE. It just wastes paper! (little joke there)

A thread or a thousand threads on this, and the USGA's having missed the need to regulate in some form this issue can born out, and will. But doggone it, it really gets old when the ''long ball'' issue (and even the damn stripe on the golf ball nuts) keep breaking the train of thought of the ''anchor'' situation.

It matters not that there is creedence to the need to discuss all this other stuff, but pointing out the USGA's ''whimp out of rules-o-mania'' is a given. Let us just get these issues going all at once, but at seperate times/places....you know what I'm talkin' 'bout.

There has been a massive problem with the Rules farting around on blades of grass, while balls, clubs, strokes and tokes(for rhyme value) have jr ust been left to their own fortunes.

Come on yall. End of sugar induced rant (I had to test the Halloween candy)
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
Agree with the anchoring ban or not, a sports ruling bodies have to have the freedom to make rules
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commenterelf
Karma will trump any law suit or court action. It almost always does. Especially in golf. Just ask Tiger.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterAmen Coroner
NC Phyllis and others - the only valid argument for it [the ban] would be "because we said so!" this? This is the only basis for a ban??

It seems to me that Rule 14.3 and the "unusual use of equipment" is pretty clear, well beyond a reasoning based on "because I say so." Maybe you can now say that because more than a few use a long putter it is no longer "unusual" but it seems beyond debate that there is ample justification in the Rules for a ban based on "unusual use" of club. And I'm not sure that there are "more than a few" who are using the putter in this way. The fact that there is so much discussion about it is evidence that the use remains "unusual."

And when one says that a rule (to include "sports rules") are arbitrary by nature and "to admit to it" reminds me of that the definition of an "arbitrary decision" is a decision that you disagree with. But I do not believe the Rules of Golf are arbitrary. They have held up pretty well for a few centuries until the ball got so far out of hand.

just my opinion -

jb
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterJim Beckner
Anchoring should be banned and many other aspects of golf such as the ball and certain equipment too....And you wonder why the game struggles for participation when they are making 7500 yard + golf courses...Roll the ball back, ban certain equipment that makes the ball go way too long and be done with it. They banned the PING grooves so why can't they man up and ban anchoring for STARTERS. I for one think they should right the wrong from 20+ years ago not addressing the issue when it started. Like they should start dealing with ball and equipment legalities NOW...
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterViz
Ryan: You're very incorrect that no court can get involved in a rules matter. (See Martin, Casey.)
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterJeff Smith
I don't think you can separate the long/anchored putter discussion from the golf ball and gear discussion. They are all about advancing the game and making it more enjoyable for the average player.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commentere9golf
@e9golf

You don't have to separate them, but if you want to arrive at some conclusion(s), then they each need to be discussed separately.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
@e9golf

You don't have to separate them, but if you want to arrive at some conclusion(s), then they each need to be discussed separately.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
Why now?

Spot on Phyllis, put another way the argument against is "I just don't like it".

Jim, clearly that rule does not apply,nor it would have already been applied. Right?

Hawk, in the mid-90s Mike Hulbert devised a putting method that completely eliminated the chances of the left wrist breaking down...

,,,he putted with one hand, the right hand. It was unconventional, very effective, looked odd, and completely eliminated the risk of the left wrist breaking down. If a couple guys up and won majors putting that way would the method be subject to a ban?

nytimes (dot) com/1995/05/20/sports/golf-with-one-hand-hulbert-climbs-to-lead (dot) html
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
And JFTR...

...RLL, that may be the most cynical post I've ever read on this site, and that's saying something!
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
RLL made a great post.

Bradley is indeed creepy. He is just the sort of guy to whine about the ban. It is all about what is best for him, not golf.

He made a freaking fool of himself at Medinah with his WAY over the top behavior. I reckon he is going to make a fool of himself over this issue instead of accepting things and making himself a good putter the right way.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commenterfyg
Everybody keeps going on about the spirit of the game/good of the game yet in truth virtually no-one is actually interested in that at all-they are only interested in how things affect them.
Anchoring is not how a shot was meant to be played so I support a ban-although I fully accept that there are bigger issues that should be faced
10.31.2012 | Unregistered Commenterchico
It is blatantly obvious what is being hopefully banned here: anchoring is not swinging! Statistical evidence and discussions on big drivers/controlling the ball are not relevant points for the USGA and R&A to consider on whether to ban it.

Much more interestingly: can anyone explain on what legal basis Bradley, Clark and others are hoping to sue? Surely the governing bodies can do as they please in setting out the rules of the game? What "rights" do those players see being breached?
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterFT
pga tour isn't compelled to bend to the will of the R&A and USGA. Keegan Bradley's appealing to the wrong people.
Bradley is a toothless tool. If he files suit he better retain a lawyer specializing in ADA actions because that's the only shot he has. Tell them it's not your fault you were born with a synapse/neuron condition. Go for it, Keegan. Admitting you have a problem is always the first step in the recovery process.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterD. maculata
Jeff Smith,

yes but the rules were superseped in the Casey Martin case by the ADA. This will not be an issue in this case unless Bradley can argue he needs his putter as a crutch while standing on the green.

Without this it is just a rules issue and no court will ever rule on this because they are not the authority to do so
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterRyan
For the record, I don't use a long putter, tried it, no better.


Jim - arbitrary to me means not based in reason but simply on a whim, or personal taste. And golf rules are arbitrary (and that's okay). Why can we use 14 clubs instead of 10, 15, or 20? As far as just "not looking like golf", I would say that outside of 20 feet, the belly putter looks much more conventional than that thing Dimarco has always done with his putter. Not to be contradictory, but I do understand the view that if the rules say that a free stroke can only be accomplished without anchoring, then write it that way end of story but don't hide behind all these garbage excuses like it's a crutch, or an unfair advantage. It's not unfair, it's available to all. Not to harp on the ball again, but who benefits more from the new ball, answer: long hitters. Dustin Johnson benefits more than Corey Pavin, is that fair?

I think e9golf comment is correct, advancements happen. I suppose in response to digsouth I would say the timing is curious at best. Why now? Because 3 guys won majors with them? But in Vegas ~2000 when the ProV came out....silence. And now 6750yds is useless but still silence...I know chicks dig the long ball....I suppose, just my opinion, that if the equipment gets approved in development, etc. it should be end of story.

RLL-My original comment had more to do with the derision being heaped on current long putter users. And I don't understand what's so offensive about Keegan Bradley. He used to spit, he's made an effort to stop. He's fidgety, big deal, ever see Hubert Green? It would be hard to descibe Adam Scott as grotesque in any way. Of course these guys would rather stick to what they know, they play for huge, life changing $$$$.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterNC Phyllis
I can understand people not like the long putters because of looks, it is not classic, it is against the spirit of the game etc... but who does it actually affect in a negative way? It certainly doesn't stop people from playing golf or cause financial difficulties for golf course owners etc.... If the Top 10 players in the world all used long putters then I would understand the desire to ban but only 2 of the top 10 or 3 of the top 20 actually use one.

Banning the long putter will stop many people who currently enjoy the game from playing in the future.

As I said earlier, the R&A and USGA are attacking the wrong targets. The 460CC drivers and new balls have affected the game far more than long putters, and not in a good way.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterTroublelove
All these guys using the long putter must not be able to putt without it otherwise they wouldn't be making a stink.
10.31.2012 | Unregistered CommenterViz

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