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« Old Course Play Suspended Due To Wind... | Main | Luck Of The Draw Does Inbee In? »
Friday
Aug022013

Blayne Barber DQ's Himself Again

And while (maybe) not as dramatic as his second stage Q-School penalty from 2012, the Web.com player could not have picked a worse time as he vies for a PGA Tour card.

Jeff Shain reports on the 66 that would have put him in second place.

As it turned out, Barber realized the error as he was discussing the aftermath of last year’s DQ with reporters. He returned to the scoring area after finishing, asked for his card and saw the discrepancy.

Once a player leaves the scoring area, his card is deemed official.

“I looked [the card] over and didn’t see it,” Barber said, noting that he’d confirmed the proper total with his walking scorer but didn’t compare the hole-by-hole scores. “Somehow I missed that one on 16.”

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Reader Comments (25)

What is he, stupid?
08.2.2013 | Unregistered CommenterGreg c
Greg c, this could never happen to you. You are too smart and conscientious.
08.2.2013 | Unregistered CommenterDoctor
Once is enough at that level. Twice is just too coinkydinky to be a fluke.
08.2.2013 | Unregistered CommenterAmen Coroner
If playing golf professionally was my livelihood, I'm pretty sure I'd figure out how to sign a correct scorecard.
08.2.2013 | Unregistered Commentergreg c
Greg C, he's either stupid, or...

As an aside, from the article: "Barber’s departure from Q-School stemmed from a bunker infraction, when he thought his club brushed a leaf during his backswing. His caddie said he never saw the leaf move, but Barber still applied a penalty stroke to his score.

It wasn’t until after the tournament that Barber learned the correct penalty for the infraction is two strokes. After wrestling with the dilemma for nearly a week, Barber called PGA TOUR officials to report the error – relinquishing his chance at a PGA TOUR or Web.com Tour card in 2013."

The part about..."wasn’t until after the tournament that Barber learned the correct penalty for the infraction is two strokes"...is flat out wrong. He found this out the night it happened and completed the following two rounds with a full understanding of the proper ruling -- a fact he failed to bring to the attention of tournament officials.

Why does the press continue to gloss over this incident?
08.2.2013 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
Dtf-- I don't think there really is any press that can cover this story. How many full time golf writers are there that aren't employed by the "machine" and actually do real reporting?? It's rare in the nfl, much less the PGA tour. Especially since its some nobody and not a drop on 15 at the masters.

As for this dude, seems a bit fishy to me. Always seems to call himself out after he knows other know (and not when he's the only one who knows). It seems like its hard for him to make arrangements with himself.

Somebody tell me why... Any theories?
And that makes "strike two!". Some schools of thought will only give you two.

Maybe he is one of those ADD golfers that were reported on a few weeks ago? Or perhaps a "functional" sociopath? Golfers are human too....but he needs realize that a scorecard is his paycheck and never take that for granted.
08.3.2013 | Unregistered Commenterjohnnnycz
I'm amazed at some of the - not too well disguised - vitriol against this chap. Has anyone actually thought it could be a genuine error? I say give him the benefit of the doubt until there is no doubt.
08.3.2013 | Unregistered CommenterStephen W
@Greg C

He attended Auburn, so the chances of that being a yes are high.
08.3.2013 | Unregistered CommenterLeeWatson
Bingo Stephen W. Who has never made mistakes at their job? His were completely different situations, and he had the honesty to do the right thing.

If you play enough tournament golf crazy $hit will happen to you, the question is do you turn yourself in or not.
And kids claim that math doesn't matter...
08.3.2013 | Unregistered Commenter3foot1
Stephen W, the facts are not in dispute.

At Q-school Barber was told the penalty he assessed himself in round 2 was 2 shots, not 1. As such, he had signed an incoreect scorecard and had no choice but to DQ himself. Instead, he kept it to himself and completed all 4 rounds, finishing high enough to advance to the next stage. 6 days later he fessed up. What is it about these facts that are unclear to you?

NYG, I hear ya. But Golf Channel has repeatedly gotten the story wrong, and the excerpt above came from a story on the PGA Tour website. You'd think if there were two media sources who could get it right it would be those two.
08.3.2013 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
Surprised no one on this has been reminded of the chap Jones who said (paraphrasing) he should be no more commended for calling a penalty on himself than a man should be commended for not robbing a bank! I'm from the school that most players would call themselves out in this situation but in this age of ROI for cheating in other professional sports, that there wouldn't be more situations in golf at the 'developmental' level like this when the high resolution cameras aren't around. Is that where you were going Neil Young & Geraldo?
08.3.2013 | Unregistered CommenterDavid Simmz
The ROI for cheating is high everywhere, not just sports.

But in some fields when you do get caught, curtains:
http://retractionwatch.wordpress.com/2012/11/20/ori-sanctions-university-of-kentucky-nutrition-researcher-for-faking-dozens-of-images-in-10-papers/
Now if only NIH will make the University of Kentucky Research Foundation return the $8 million.

In others, not so much. Just the cost of doing business:
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2010/07/15/goldman-to-settle-with-s-e-c-for-550-million/?_r=0
From promoting crap to cornering the market in aluminum...life is good at the other GS.

Still, I think young Mr. Barber should be left alone, for now.
08.3.2013 | Unregistered CommenterKLG
Del, TGC still acts like that faker is a hero for not eating, and then claiming he had an anxiety attack.
08.3.2013 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
@ Johnnycz "scorecard is his paycheck".....perfectly stated.
The LORD knows the details. HE will see me through
Blayne Barber is hell of a dude. If you knew the guy the subject of cheating would be out the window. This guy will be on the PGA tour and he deserves the benefit of the doubt on this one. I have competed with Blayne since we were kids, he's a class act.
08.3.2013 | Unregistered CommenterMazz
The LORD knows the details. HE will see me through
08.3.2013 | The Rules Official


the battle cry of every criminal recast as a born again.
08.3.2013 | Unregistered Commenterbuford t.
Are Blayne Barber and Elliot Saltman kindred spirits... professional golfers division?
08.4.2013 | Unregistered CommenterOWGR Fan
@Mazz. i have to ask you - why did Blayne take six days before 'fessing up to signing for the wrong score in Q School? He knew what he had done the night of the infraction and yet took six days to come clean. A class act would have done the decent as soon as he knew that he was guilty of signing an incorrect score card - no?
08.4.2013 | Unregistered Commentermetro18
Good question metro. I will be interested to hear the response if you get one.
08.4.2013 | Unregistered CommenterDTF
Blayne dated my sister for 3 years. He has always been a con artist and shallow person
08.4.2013 | Unregistered CommenterZuke
Mazz. Zuke. really?
08.5.2013 | Unregistered Commenterdigsouth
time for someone from the tour to sit down with this guy and tell him he needs to be more careful, and that the next "screw up" will earn him a suspension.
08.5.2013 | Unregistered Commentersmails

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